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From the PA Outdoor News: "A number of states have implemented dropping antler point restrictions after CWD positive deer were discovered. They have taken that action because a large majority of yearling bucks disperse up to 12 miles in the spring and fall. Such dispersal of CWD positive bucks spreads the disease. Eliminating antler restrictions is a strategy to slow that dispersal. Michigan, Missouri and Arkansas recently dropped their antler restrictions. Will Pennsylvania soon follow? Eliminating antler restrictions to deal with CWD has been accepted by hunters in the other states.

Would you support it?

Is it a better option than bringing in sharpshooters after the season to eradicate the deer herds in the CWD areas?
 

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Yeah.... Right....
18 month old buck do SO much to the overall whitetail population...

CWD is here to stay. Get over it. Move on.
Kill off the elk herd first... once they are gone, let's see how many new drastic changes are made...
 

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How come?

Yeah.... Right....
18 month old buck do SO much to the overall whitetail population...

CWD is here to stay. Get over it. Move on.
Kill off the elk herd first... once they are gone, let's see how many new drastic changes are made...
Wadman, how come CWD areas are not near near the Elk populations? Duh.:surprise2:
 

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DUH...
Heard of DMA3?
Educate yourself.

Removing antler restrictions will do nothing to stop spread. The elk no longer belong here. Sorry... they were killed off long ago. Thats just what happens with human expansion. Some things gotta go. Part of the losing battle they are fighting.
 

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DUH...
Heard of DMA3?
Educate yourself.

Removing antler restrictions will do nothing to stop spread. The elk no longer belong here. Sorry... they were killed off long ago. Thats just what happens with human expansion. Some things gotta go. Part of the losing battle they are fighting.
I think others are in denial that the deer do not cross the DMA lines. Just wait a year, it will be in their backyard too.
 

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DUH...
Heard of DMA3?
Educate yourself.

Removing antler restrictions will do nothing to stop spread. The elk no longer belong here. Sorry... they were killed off long ago. Thats just what happens with human expansion. Some things gotta go. Part of the losing battle they are fighting.
This is one of the dumbest things that I have ever read on this site.
 

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I would support dropping AR regardless of the reason.
yep, not everyone is a trophy hunter, some of us just like deer meat.
Big rocky mountain oyster fan? Does are pretty darn tasty too.

I do support the lifting of antler restrictions in the DMAs. Kill them all off there, may not stop the spread but it sure could slow it.

And elk should be in most of the state, I have tremendous disdain for our boneheaded predecessors who killed them off.
 

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Shoot a doe then.
I do. still no reason why a lot of us should have to pass on a deer because it isn't a wall hanger.
Not to bicker, I really do understand how AR could be frustrating in someone else's shoes, but letting bucks see their 2nd birthday isn't exactly trophy hunting or anything. For what it's worth I also think it is wrong that AR apply on private land. I'm not even convinced the amount of true wallhangers have increased as significantly as the amount of "decent" 2 and 3 year old bucks that have become the new norm.
 

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The question is how effective would it be to remove AR, or how devastating would it be not to. This should not be about what hunter preference is. Let the facts drive the decision.

That said, we know yearling bucks relocate but do they come in contact with more deer than an older buck? Or is distance traveled more important.

How many yearlings would be killed that AR would have otherwise saved? And what is an acceptance number?

The other side is how devastating is CWD. PA is not the first and it’s been around for a long time. I think we need to use other states experiences for this. The way I’ve heard others talk, we’re not going to have a deer herd in a couple years. I’m not downplaying CWD, but call it what it is. It is here to stay. We should try to limit or slow it, if possible if it’s proven to work. But the ultimate question is how drastic of measures should be taken and how effective will they be.

Obviously if it’s transferable to humans that ups the significance some because who is going to hunt if it is? I gotta tell ya, an old friend shot the 3rd positive CWD tested wild deer in the state. Perfectly healthy looking buck. He ate half of it before getting the results. He died last year at age 38. Now, I have no confirmation but I suspect drug OD, but it kind freaks me out. I got a freezer full of meat with buck and doe marked separately. Buck wasn’t too far from a designated area although this disease could be spread a long ways...

I would have no issue with the removal of AR. I think the seed has been sown that age was the missing factor in PAs buck herd and a lot of hunters will pass on younger bucks now. Hunter numbers and effort continues to fall so I can’t imagine our buck herd getting that much younger by removing AR. There will still be mature bucks for some guys to hunt and there will be spikes for guys to hunt. The trophy is in the eye of the beholder.
 

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The only thing ar has done is give that yearling one or two more years. The size of the rack has to do with how heathy the deer is coming out of winter and the amount of food there is compared to the number of deer in that area. When I started hunting there was a lot more deer but not many buck with the rack size we see today as an average. The deer numbers are lower and the rack sizes are bigger. Less deer more food.
The cwd problem is bigger then most know. From what I understand it's a prion that is left in the soil and can be found for years.
Environmental transmission has been linked to contact with infected bodily fluids and tissues, as well as contact with contaminated environments. Once in the environment, CWD prions may remain infectious for many years. Thus, decomposition of diseased carcasses, infected "gut piles" from hunters who field dress their cervid harvests, as well as the urine, saliva, feces, and antler velvet of infected individuals that are deposited in the environment, all have the potential to create infectious environmental reservoirs of CWD.

One avian scavenger, the American crow, was recently evaluated as a potential vector for CWD. As CWD prions remain viable after passing through the bird's digestive tract, crows represent a possible mechanism for the creation of environmental reservoirs of CWD.Additionally, the crows' extensive geographic range presents ample opportunities for them to come in contact with CWD. This coupled with the population density and longevity of communal roosting sites in both urban and rural locations suggests that the fecal deposits at roosting sites may represent a CWD environmental reservoir.[Conservative estimates for crows' fecal deposits at one winter roosting site for one winter season ranged from 391,552 - 599,032 kg.
 
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