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Discussion Starter #1
Over the years, I've owned 2 Nikon Archer's choice. Both were very accurate out to about 100 yds, both were worth nothing when it was raining or foggy, both had angle compensation (which is nice, but not essential). After the second one went on me, I decided to go with a Vortex 1000, due to the warranty that Vortex has- lifetime. I've used it on some local 3D shoots and have found it to be off by as much as 5 yards on dark targets and in dark situations. As you know, 5 yards is the difference between a good kill, a miss, or worse, a long night tracking. I called Vortex and they said that that is acceptable at short distances on that range finder - it's less accurate under 50 yards than it is at 500- especially on black or dark targets. Since Nikon does not make the Archers Choice anymore, I'm looking for opinions- only parameters- max cost- $275. Any recommendations?
 

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I have had the Archers choice for years. Buy something cheaper like that and range some trees in the beginning of the season to get your distances. After that I don't pull out my range finder while in the field. Have tree marked in my head how far they are.

If you're a mobile hunter and hunt different trees all the time then I can see the need to have one out at all times, but why the extra step if it isn't needed.

I actually use mine about once a year and wonder why I even bought the things (bought one for my grandfather as well that he doesn't even use).
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have had the Archers choice for years. Buy something cheaper like that and range some trees in the beginning of the season to get your distances. After that I don't pull out my range finder while in the field. Have tree marked in my head how far they are.

If you're a mobile hunter and hunt different trees all the time then I can see the need to have one out at all times, but why the extra step if it isn't needed.

I actually use mine about once a year and wonder why I even bought the things (bought one for my grandfather as well that he doesn't even use).
I'm a "mobil hunter" in that we set 10-15 lockon stands, 4-6 ladders, and readily use my climber 4-5 hunts per week. I will rarely hunt the same area or stand twice in a week, so remembering distances isn't one of my stronger points. Even though I do a lot of 3D, I still like to get set, get my 30 yard circle of landmarks with a range finder.
 

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I have had the Archers choice for years. Buy something cheaper like that and range some trees in the beginning of the season to get your distances. After that I don't pull out my range finder while in the field. Have tree marked in my head how far they are.

If you're a mobile hunter and hunt different trees all the time then I can see the need to have one out at all times, but why the extra step if it isn't needed.

I actually use mine about once a year and wonder why I even bought the things (bought one for my grandfather as well that he doesn't even use).
I do the same thing except I put a small piece of colored marking tape on a tree branch for 20-30-40 yards. I try to use a different color for each distance. I put them in my shooting lanes or generally at 10 oclock 12 oclock and 2 oclock. Works well for me, and keeps me from having to mess around with my range finder.
 

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I'm a "mobil hunter" in that we set 10-15 lockon stands, 4-6 ladders, and readily use my climber 4-5 hunts per week. I will rarely hunt the same area or stand twice in a week, so remembering distances isn't one of my stronger points. Even though I do a lot of 3D, I still like to get set, get my 30 yard circle of landmarks with a range finder.
In that case I do just as Marcus posted below me. Use a couple pieces of tape to mark it off at the beginning of the season and be done with it. Personally 2 pieces at 20, 3 at 30. Problem solved and you won't have to worry about a rangefinder in the field. What if the battery died? Would you stop hunting or use your best judgement? Tape on the trees would eliminate both problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
In that case I do just as Marcus posted below me. Use a couple pieces of tape to mark it off at the beginning of the season and be done with it. Personally 2 pieces at 20, 3 at 30. Problem solved and you won't have to worry about a rangefinder in the field. What if the battery died? Would you stop hunting or use your best judgement? Tape on the trees would eliminate both problems.
Good idea for lock ons and ladders- no help at all with using a climber. Thanks for all the imput- got a great deal on a Leopold!
 

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I use a Leica as well. Best RF I've ever used.

I got mine at CameralandNY when they ran a sale and got it for 200 bucks.

I'd have happily paid twice that now that I've used it. I love that thing. It goes with me every hunt, without fail.
 

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I bought a bushnell scout 1000DX last year. It seems to work very well. I also like it because I can use it as binoculars with the 4x. It's helped a couple times.
 

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I have a Leupold RX-1200i TBR/W with DNA it's excellent. Not sure on the price Leupold sent it to me free for sending them a picture they saw on HPA. Being just a bow hunter it's more than I need but it's one of the better rangefinders out there
 

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After searching the market for a good rangefinder I finally decided to bite the bullet on the Leupold RX 850i TBR.
Got it on Amazon for $197.
It has all the features except an illuminated readout/recticle and for the price, it's not so bad.
For a crossbow hunter who does not use stands, I find it an absolute necessity for me to have a good, reliable rangefinder to increase my percentages for a clean/er kill.
 
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