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Discussion Starter #1
I've read some on guys using annual clovers that they frost seed where they intend to put brassicas in the fall. The idea being the clover will provide early spring greens for deer even if browsed a good bit and still be a great source of nitrogen for your brassicas to feed on when you switch it over late summer and produce big tops in the fall. Anyone ever try this? Any experience with annual clovers at all? What species or seed did you use?
 

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Berseem clover is annual clover that is in a lot seed mixes with clover. If memory serves me correctly, it cannot be frost-seeded...but I'm not 100% on that.

A red clover would be cheap enough to frost seed in the spring ahead of a brassica fall planting, adding Nitrogen as you said. White clover will work as well, but red would be a better price to be tilled in as green manure for a fall planting.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That's what I have read too OA, I still have some planning to do but I am going to try this in a couple plots and see how it goes.
 
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I've never frost seeded annual clovers but I planted crimson clover with winter rye and oats for a fall food plot. The crimson clover grew enough for a food source that fall and continued to grow the next year. I tried a mix of crimson clover and balansa clover with rye and oats this fall. For some reason neither clover grew very well so far.


The annual clovers seem to grow a little faster than red, white and ladino clover which may allow them to be used as a food source in the spring when planted in the spring. Whereas red, white and ladino clovers may not grow enough to be a food source until you are ready to kill them in late summer/fall.


Most clover cost about the same in the end. Ladino clover costs a little more per pound but requires less pounds per acre. $8/lb at 5lb/acre costs the same $5/lb at 8lb/ac.
 

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Actually you can plant the red clover in the fall with the brassica's. The clover will come back up in the Spring. I did it once with good results. Saves you from working the ground up twice a year.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
That is a good idea too. I had very poor output this year from what I believe was lack of rain and over grazing. We had a LOT of corn in our area this year so I think my plots took a lot of abuse before ears formed on the corn and with the lack of rain they all looked like the putting greens on a golf course...or a soldiers first hair cut if you will. I am considering this approach to jump start things in the spring and provide nitrogen for the fall planting is all.

Outdoorsman I have found better prices on clover than that online, I have not checked with my local co-op yet as their prices seem to change more often.
 
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