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Is there any downfall to removing beech trees? I've been reading that American Beech nuts are good for the critters, but I'm looking to expand my yard and I'm thinking of removing all the beech trees, old growth and saplings. Other than beech, I also have a lot of oak, cheery and maple in my yard as well, I'm am only looking to remove the beech, should I?
Would a forester even come out to give me some tips? Granted i'm not working with 30 acres, more like 5.
 

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Turkeys and deer love beech nuts. I have a small stand of about 20 Beech trees at the end of my wood lot and in late October, the leaves and duff will be all scratched up from the turkeys hunting for beech nuts. (of course they are long gone come turkey season.) American Beech is not particularly in demand as a lumber tree, but is popular among hobbyists and wood turners. Beech wood flexes a lot even when cut and dried into boards , which limits it's uses. Expand yard=grass seeding and mowing. I would keep the trees. A local wood turner's club/members might be glad to take the wood away for you. Don't know that you could sell it, unless there is a specialty mill nearby that has a market for "out of the ordinary" woods. There are a few such mills in PA, like Groffs in Southern Lancaster County.. Depends on how big the trees are and how many. Groff's sells a lot of odd domestic woods but does not list any beech. However, there are about 200 listings for beech lumber for sale on ebay.
 

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There are several serious beech tree diseases which means there are few nut bearing trees around. Instead, you normally see beech brush trees in the understory that will never become mature trees.

If you have healthy Beech trees that produce nuts, I would say keep them. If not healthy, feel free to remove. As they decline, big ones might become dangerous. Smaller trees you could easily remove as they probably won't get old enough to produce nuts.

Beech Diseases ? Plant Diseases ? Penn State Extension
 

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Discussion Starter #5
There are several serious beech tree diseases which means there are few nut bearing trees around. Instead, you normally see beech brush trees in the understory that will never become mature trees.

If you have healthy Beech trees that produce nuts, I would say keep them. If not healthy, feel free to remove. As they decline, big ones might become dangerous. Smaller trees you could easily remove as they probably won't get old enough to produce nuts.

Beech Diseases ? Plant Diseases ? Penn State Extension
The smaller ones are my main concern right now as they make up most of the understory. 90% of the smaller beech's are pencil thin but 10' > high. Others are maybe 5" in diameter and taller. I do have a couple of larger beech's, one has the base rotting out and the others look healthy but I'm positive they arent producing nuts. Right now though, the oaks in the yard are already dropping acorns, nothing big, just small acorns at the moment.
 
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