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With the pending regulations on a Airgun use for small game if it passes I may purchase one
What is a good reliable accurate easy to cock and load rifle for squirrels? Also with a good suppressor. Thanks for your input.
 

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I have a Nitro Venom Dusk barrel break pellet gun made by Crossman in .177 it came with a 3x9 scope. Shoots great although a little on the heavy side at 6lbs loaded, feels more like my 06, it is said to take out groundhogs, coons, and possums. If I were looking to buy a pellet gun for hunting it would be a 22 cal.. Gamo has some very nice guns to choose from check them out also...Good luck with what ever you choose....
 

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According to a local WCO, it seems that the possible coming regulations limit airgun use to .177 and .22 caliber. So you may not want to look at the .25's................ although I don't understand why a .25 nitro piston wouldn't be as good as, if not better, at dispatching smallish critters.
 

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Just something I was told by a friend and not sure it is 100% true but makes sense to me? He has an RWS which is a tack driver as I have witnessed what it can do. Another friend bought a break barrel air rifle and wasn't nearly as accurate and was told it is because the scope is mounted towards the back of the rifle and not on the barrel so every time you cock it the scope may not be exactly still in line with the bore? Make sense to anyone else? The RWS costs roughly 3 or 4 times what the cheaper ones on the market cost so it should shoot better? Just because a certain rifle is fast doesn't mean much if it isn't accurate!
 

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I did a lot research on Airgun forum before I purchased my RWS 22 caliber. I also bought a Hawk scope that has a lifetime warranty. I highly recommend the rifle.
 

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Had a Dianawerk break barrel model years ago. It was a 22 caliber. Could hit M&M's at 10 meters all day long with peep sights. Of course it cost $150 40 years ago. Even had a place for a palm rest.
 

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Pyramid air will give you a lot of choices and info.
 

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Benjamin/Sheridens are good choices too .177 -.20 -.22 cal
 

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back in 1986 i worked in a gun store that sold airguns. we sold mostly RWS and Benjamin rifles. the RWS models were very accurate. if putting a scope on one make sure its a air rifle scope. the recoil of an air rifle is different from a regular rifle.
 

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I'm not up to speed on what the new regs would be, but I killed quite a few sage rats one weekend with my Benjamin Marauder pistol in 22 cal. PCP's might not be what you're after though if you want to be able to be walking through the woods for long periods.
 

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I own a .22 Benjamin Trail NP (original edition) with black synthetic stock. It's a nitro piston single shot break barrel. It came with a decent 3-9x40mm CenterPoint. I've used it mainly for plinking and some light varmint/pest control (only on my property). Look into the improved Trail NP2 if you're interested in a single-shot break barrel.
I hope to own the Umarex Gauntlet in .22 someday. It's a newer regulated PCP (pre-charged pneumatic) bolt action capable of ~60 shots on a single charge. A 10-shot magazine is included and additional magazines are available as accessories. My understanding is that Benjamin Marauder magazines are compatible. You will need to add a scope and high-pressure hand pump and/or tank. If you don't want to mess with a pump, you'll need a high-pressure air fill source for your tank, such as a local diving shop.

My first airgun was a Daisy 860 multi-pump rifle (iron sights) that claimed many pigeons, sparrows and the occasional squirrel in my youth. :)
 

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According to a local WCO, it seems that the possible coming regulations limit airgun use to .177 and .22 caliber...
Your WCO may not be entirely accurate. According to a few sources, acceptable calibers for small game will be from .177 to .22, but for woodchucks and furbearers, air guns will need to be at least .22. While not as popular, there are some air guns in .20 (5.0mm).

See:


 

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I just recently got a Benjamin.177 that came with a 4x32 scope. I shot it in yesterday in the back yard on a lead sled, it shoots great too.
 

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2017-18 Hunting Digest states
PGC said:
Air-guns for small game in calibers from .177 to .22 for small game, for woodchucks at least 22-caliber
(emphasis mine)
I interpret this to mean there is no specified upper restriction on airgun caliber for woodchucks, and .25 or larger is also allowed...
And under Firearms While Trapping,
PGC said:
To dispatch trapped animals during deer season, trappers are limited to...or air- or gas-operated firearms that are 22-caliber.
I found no other information related to airgun caliber for furbearers, but if I understand correctly, airguns (presumably .22 or larger) may also be used to take furbearers that may be taken with a hunting license (e.g. coyote)? .22 (particularly airgun) seems small for a 'yote unless the muzzle is practically against the skull...
 

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Shoot a 'yote or a fox or the biggest coon in the ear (in line to come out the other ear) with a .22 or .177 pellet from an adult type rifle at trap chain length and it'll be dead before it hits the ground. Yep.

Not sure I understand why no .25 cal for small game................. ??? There's quite a few affordable choices in .25 cal that would put a real whoopin on a rabbit or squirrel.
 

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Shoot a 'yote or a fox or the biggest coon in the ear (in line to come out the other ear) with a .22 or .177 pellet from an adult type rifle at trap chain length and it'll be dead before it hits the ground.
I hear ya. But that's good for dispatching something trapped. My comments were more about hunting/stalking. For that scenario, .25 or (preferably) larger could humanely take a 'yote. My ideal would be something like the Hatsan Carnivore BT in .357 (also available in .30), with game at 50 yards or under. To elude rightful scorn of the PGC and traditional firearm hunters, among other things, airgunners will need to keep themselves sharp (lots of practice) and know/respect their limits. I view hunting with an airgun as more akin to bow hunting than traditional firearm hunting.
 

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I just recently got a Benjamin.177 that came with a 4x32 scope. I shot it in yesterday in the back yard on a lead sled, it shoots great too.
after awhile it started shooting off so I got another scope and it shoots a lot better. Nailed 18 sparrows with it! :grin2:
 

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I have a lot of experience with air guns, more than most of the posters on here and a lot less than people who have been serious air gunners for years. I am pleased that PA has finally seen the light.

I am not sure why they backed off of .25 caliber. I don't currently own a .25 all of mine, YES all of mine, are .177 or .22 caliber. Some are more accurate than others and all but my one Youth Rifle are capable of humane hunting (in the right hands.)

Like many archery hunters know, it is ALL ABOUT SHOT PLACEMENT.

I have taken a woodchuck out to 397 yards with a .17 WSM Savage B-Mag, 1 shot 1 kill. 185 yards with a .17HMR and yet had a crawl off at 323 yards with my 204 Ruger. I have taken many out to 190 yards with my old 22 hornet and yet had a younger one with the will to live at 160 yards with my Hornet. I shot that one 3 times at range and when I walked out to collect it the thing was still laboring to catch its breath. I finished it off with the WSM.

This was one taken Wednesday at 25 yards with an average power, average weight .22 cal pellet 14.3gr.



If you are new to airguns or relatively new I can answer a lot of questions but you'll find a lot of good information on Forums specific to airguns. Gateway or GTA is one of the best. Also there is a good blog on Pyramyd Air written by Tom Gaylord. Basic info to detailed. How to zero a scope, should you use optics, is a very good read.

I have a few suggestions on 1st time air guns for hunting. Be prepared to invest $200 in a starter rifle, $100 in good decent pellets and if your gun came with a scope be prepared to swap that out in the near future.

Side note about scopes. Airgun rated scopes means 1 of 2 things or both. The most widely known is that they are designed or supposed to be designed to take the dual recoil of harsh spring air guns. Most common are break barrel but it is not limited to them. The other is that the scope has a parallax adjustment to 10 yards or 30 feet or less. Just because they are air gun rated does not mean they will outlast your rifle. I had a BSA 3-12x44AO airgun rated scope that I bought used. It was a little dark but it held zero and I could consistently shoot .177 pellets into the opening of a soda pop can at 75-100 feet. Later I bought a new version of the same scope and put it on the rifle I intended to use for hunting in NY. That rifle was a nitro piston, synthetic stock gun and it kicked like a mule. That rifle destroyed that scope in under 50 shots.

Anyway for hunting small game I suggest a .22 either a PCP such as the Benjamin Discovery or Maximus Hunter, a Benjamin Titan or one of the Trail NP2. The last 2 are break barrels. If you choose a break barrel try to get one that the pivot is a screw or bolt and not a pin. The bolt can be tightened or adjusted to maintain accuracy.
 
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