The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just picked up a new AJP PR4 a week ago. It's mostly intended for off-road use, but I'll be licensing it for intermittent road time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,646 Posts
Plus that taillight don,t look like it would ever be DOT legal.Looks like you will have to do some modifying.I imagine you will have to modify the electrical charging system as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
The bike is factory wired for signals, but the PA vehicle code doesn't require them for inspection. However; if it has does have them, they have to function. I may still put small signals on it.

The taillight/brakelight is likely too small for DOT spec. It would likely still pass inspection, but I'll be putting a larger unit on there just to be safe.

The electrical system is sized for full lighting. AJP sells a fully lighted version of the PR4 overseas, but they aren't importing that version into the US yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
835 Posts
nice looking bike, I am not familiar with this brand.

led lighting has taken brightness to a new level while managing to keep things small.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
good ole boy said:
I think that it is the same brand I read about in last months issue of Cycle World.If it is it is a Chinese import.
AJP motorcycles are made in Portugal. They've been building bikes for 28 years and most of the motorcycle is designed and manufactured by them. They've had bikes compete (and place well) in some serious enduro/hare scramble events, including the Rebull Romaniacs race. They are not a Chinese import.

However; the motor is made by Zongshen, which is a well renowned Chinese engine builder. Unlike most of the other junk that comes out of China, Zongshen is an ISO9001 cerfified company with corporate partnerships with Aprilia, Moto Guzzi, Vespa and even Harley Davidson.

Like most American motorcyclists, I don't have a good opinion of the motorcycles China imports into the U.S.. It took quite a bit of research to convince myself that the engine in these bikes are worth taking a chance on. To this point, I have been quite pleased with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
deerchaser said:
nice looking bike, I am not familiar with this brand.
They have only been inported into the U.S. for 2 years. There are only a handful of dealers, with the closest two being Philadelphia, PA. and Grand Island (Buffalo), NY.

It's a neat bike, with a well thought out design towards trail riding, as opposed to racing. I currently own a 2011 KTM 450, which is a great bike when you have some room to move, but a handful in real tight single track. The AJP was bought for my wife as a light trail bike for her to putt around on, but I'm also hoping (for me) it picks up where the KTM falls short.

At this point my wife absolutely loves it, but her last bike was a DR650, which is about 140lbs heavier than the PR4. I'm still waiting to hit the trails before I form a thorough opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
A couple additional pictures. I swapped out the OEM handlebar setup for ProTaper Contour bars with a 1" riser, along with Cycra Probend handguards and Scott Duece grips. I also added a MSR folding mirror and MSR brake saver cable. I converted both tires to the TUBliss system (which I love on my KTM), and went from a 48t to a 45t rear sprocket as the bike was geared too low for my liking.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,060 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I've had a chance to put some miles on this bike when the weather was better. I really can't complain about the bike. For what they cost new I'd say it's a heck of a bargain.

The pros are:
-It is light weight and very well balanced.
-The short wheelbase makes navigating through tight areas easier.
-It has plenty of suspension for non-race pace riding, and it is a better ride at low speeds.
-There's plenty of ground clearance for obstacles.
-It has very tractable power, which is to say that it isn't a powerhouse, which makes keeping traction pretty easy. It's also nearly impossible to over throttle (whiskey throttle) yourself into trouble.
-Ergonomics are good.
-The lower seat height is nice after being on a full height enduro for a while.

The cons are:
-Low bottom end power makes it harder to loft a wheel over objects without proper warning.
-The suspension is a little soft for harder hits and jumps. It has occasion to bottom out when pushed hard.
-The short wheelbase makes it a bit twitchy at times, and harder to maintain a straight line in rough terrain.
-The lack of sixth gear, combined with woods gearing, limits the top speed to 60mph.
-The OE tires aren't the greatest for soft terrain.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top