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Nice catch. Would you mind giving a few details about the set? Knowing you tend not to set dirt holes makes me think that the rock in the foreground of the pic would probably have been where I'd have set vs the log. The log just seems like an awfully tall backing to me.
 

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did not know i had a fan out there no i don,t post all my pic just a couple give me your cell number ill text them to you to keep you up dated. kipp got the pic and zagman
 

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Hale87 said:
trappin4reds2010 said:
The log just seems like an awfully tall backing to me.
Too tall? Give me a round bale any day!
Fields are different in my experience. In the woods, that just seemed a bit claustrophobic for a coyote set. Obviously it was not....
 

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i'd have trouble trapping in a field!! now logging roads..........!!!
 

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trappin4reds2010 said:
Hale87 said:
trappin4reds2010 said:
The log just seems like an awfully tall backing to me.
Too tall? Give me a round bale any day!
Fields are different in my experience. In the woods, that just seemed a bit claustrophobic for a coyote set. Obviously it was not....
Not sure why fields or timber would be any different? There's not much I wouldn't set in front of.
 

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Hale87 said:
trappin4reds2010 said:
Hale87 said:
trappin4reds2010 said:
The log just seems like an awfully tall backing to me.
Too tall? Give me a round bale any day!
Fields are different in my experience. In the woods, that just seemed a bit claustrophobic for a coyote set. Obviously it was not....
Not sure why fields or timber would be any different? There's not much I wouldn't set in front of.
A lot of research confirms that canines (and bobcats) approach and work a set from a distance that is directly related to the height of the backing. The distance is different for fox, yotes and cats. It's in one of Mark June's books. They made sets in a dirt field with backings of various heights and then measured the distance from tracks left in the dirt to the backing. The results were very consistent. Of course there are always exceptions to the rule and in this case a flat set was used so the point of interest was likely not the log or right up against it. And the trap placement was obviously correct for the given terrain. I'm guessing it was a few feet back from the log. Had it been a dirt hole right against the log then the trap placement would have had to be pretty far back since a coyote would feel pretty uneasy lowering its head and sticking it's nose in a hole with the the log not allowing it to keep an eye out as it investigated. Again, this is based upon things I have read and the fact that I've never had much luck setting close to a tall backing on anything but grey fox, coon, and fisher. They don't seem to mind at all... Just my two cents and the reason for my question.

As for round bales, I've set near and amongst them but never right up against. Aside from the reasons I just mentioned I've chosen to skip having to explain to a farmer why a coyote tore up a round bale and why I didn't just make the set a few feet away.....
 

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trappin4reds2010 said:
Hale87 said:
trappin4reds2010 said:
Hale87 said:
trappin4reds2010 said:
The log just seems like an awfully tall backing to me.
Too tall? Give me a round bale any day!
Fields are different in my experience. In the woods, that just seemed a bit claustrophobic for a coyote set. Obviously it was not....
Not sure why fields or timber would be any different? There's not much I wouldn't set in front of.
A lot of research confirms that canines (and bobcats) approach and work a set from a distance that is directly related to the height of the backing. The distance is different for fox, yotes and cats. It's in one of Mark June's books. They made sets in a dirt field with backings of various heights and then measured the distance from tracks left in the dirt to the backing. The results were very consistent. Of course there are always exceptions to the rule and in this case a flat set was used so the point of interest was likely not the log or right up against it. And the trap placement was obviously correct for the given terrain. I'm guessing it was a few feet back from the log. Had it been a dirt hole right against the log then the trap placement would have had to be pretty far back since a coyote would feel pretty uneasy lowering its head and sticking it's nose in a hole with the the log not allowing it to keep an eye out as it investigated. Again, this is based upon things I have read and the fact that I've never had much luck setting close to a tall backing on anything but grey fox, coon, and fisher. They don't seem to mind at all... Just my two cents and the reason for my question.

As for round bales, I've set near and amongst them but never right up against. Aside from the reasons I just mentioned I've chosen to skip having to explain to a farmer why a coyote tore up a round bale and why I didn't just make the set a few feet away..... [/quote

Never really took this serious so here goes the short version.... I think it's funny when so many people talk about backing height but never mention how wide said backing is or how it's being used. You can set pretty darn close to the base of a 50 foot tree because it's narrow and easy for a critter to see around. Round bales..... I use them for something I call secondary backing. Point is you use something like a grass tuft a couple feet out but keep it close enough that it's awkward for him to even consider working your set from the back. All very common sense based with no book needed.
 

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Ya. Kinda like how yotklrbill probably used the larger log as a "secondary backing" which was the main reason I asked him to provide details about the set in the first place. I was curious how he would set that up since he's a more experienced and successful coyote trapper than you or I am.
But I guess it's not really worth considering backing height when placing the trap. Just use common sense. That's all there is to it. Have a nice season boys. I. Am. Outta here.
 

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I understand about not setting in front of a tall backing, and this may be a dumb newbie question, could you not set along the backing so the yote can see while investigating the hole? probably goes back to word "backing", there would be none. Guess I answered my own question.
 

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If in doubt about backing why not set two, one at log one at the rock?
 
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