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Discussion Starter #1
Sighted in my new gun today. Its a 300 mag. Sighted in for about 2 1/4" high at 100yds. Almost 3/4 high at 200. We shot at three hundred as well and I was hitting only about 5 inches low. (grouped three shots about the size of the top of a beer can.) All this with regular 180 grain Rem. Core Lokts. Does that seem like hardly any drop? I thought it would be three or four inches more according to the ballistics on Remingtons web site.
 

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Ballistic tables are only used as reference, not the bible.
When they make the ballistics table, they usually have a certain type rifle with a certain type barrel length and then they publish the data that they found using that particular load and that particular bullet. Not that it would hurt anything - as long as you knew where to aim and was not trying to make neck or head shots on whitetail deer.

Unless you are going to shoot 300+ yards, there is no reason to sight in your rifle that high.

The 300 Winchester Magnum performs best with a 180 gr bullet and maximum loads.
All 300 Winchester Magnums that I know of that was made after 1963 was all with pressure proof steel, and all of the rifles were designed to be used with maximum pressure loads - hence you get maximum performance out of even cheap store bought shells.

There were people in the 50's that rechambered / rebarreled the 338 and made the 30 -338, which is basically the same round.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.300_Winchester_Magnum..

The benchmark that all other rounds is compared to is the old 30-06 Springfield.

The 300 Winchester Magnum has more down range velocity and power at 300 yards then most factory loads for the 30-06 has at the barrel with the same bullet.

A very good round and a very good gun.
 

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When I used to hunt Wyoming and Montana, I always sighted my rifles (270 & 7mm Magnum) in 3" high @ 100 yards, which would put me right on at 275 yards or so.
 

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Big Ken said:
When I used to hunt Wyoming and Montana, I always sighted my rifles (270 & 7mm Magnum) in 3" high @ 100 yards, which would put me right on at 275 yards or so.
Read the published data for each round and decide for yourself how high to sight it in for.
The ballistics table says its point blank range is 300 yards when you zero it for 254 yards. it maybe 2 inches high at 100 yards.. Mine with hand loads is more like 1 1/2 high at 100...
 

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IMO your on right track you did right thing shootin at different ranges 1,2,300 yds. 2-21/2 seems good 180 gr. core-lokt would be my choice... Good Luck on your hunt....later
 

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In my rifle, the Federal Fusion / Classic / Power Shock, shoots as good as or even better then the Remington's.
But they all seem hit about the same place, so most times if I am going to shoot factory loads, my decision on which round to buy is based more on which round the gun is already sighted in for and how good of a bullet I can get and how good of a deal I can get on a couple of boxes of shells. If I find a round that works well, I will go back to the same store, but the same round with the same lot number and buy several more boxes.

My opinion is that since there was no old guns - obsolete, chambered for the 300 Winchester Magnum, that they load every round to the max from the factory and that there is not a lot to be gained by buying one manufacturer's round over another or by shooting only one manufacturers rounds.

My problem is - my rifle shoots the 150 gr bullets equally well and it is hard sometimes to remember which round the gun is sighted in for since I have both bullet weights in my gun cabinet drawer.

A good rifle and the use of good optics is the key to good accuracy when it comes to shooting the .300 Winchester Magnum - premium bullets does not shoot any better in my opinion then does cheap bullets out to 300 yards.

If you were going to hunt - Montana, Colorado, Utah, Kansas, Texas where you knew you could shoot 500 yards - and you were going to hunt elk or sheep or Bears or other large or dangerous game, then a premium bullet would be necessary. But for a little old whitetail deer or bear - the cheap factory loads works equally well.
Maybe even better - because at $25 - $35 a box, you can afford to practice and not just rely on a one time - sighting in the rifle to learn how it shoots at all ranges..

Some people will buy a box of shells, shoot 5 times, hit the bulls eye at 100 yards and then use the ballistics table on the back of the box as a bible - as per how they think their rifle will shoot at 200 or 300 yards.

If I had $100 for every-time I missed a deer because I aimed over its back with other rifles or shotguns with punkin balls - I would be a millionaire right now.

I have found that it is best to shoot directly at the deer and let the bullet do its job and not try to be a ballistics calculator and try to figure out where the bullet is going to hit at a certain distance.

In a hurry, you will be wrong more times then you will be right.
That is where the 300 Winchester Magnum works best!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I will be shooting 300+ potentially. I have killed three elk with the core lokts in a 7mm mag. I was asking because this is the first 300 mag that I have owned. I just thought there would be a little more drop than the five inches I got today. I was pleasantly surprised. I am going to stick with the core lokts, they shoot well for me, and I have never had any performance issues on Elk and alot of deer. (Large bodied Muleys)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I should have stated that this is for an upcoming Elk and deer hunt in Montana. Ive done quite a bit of Elk hunting, but with the bow and different caliber rifles.
 

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Big Elk Hunter said:
I have found that it is best to shoot directly at the deer and let the bullet do its job and not try to be a ballistics calculator and try to figure out where the bullet is going to hit at a certain distance.
 

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I sight my .300 in 3" also for long range shooting. I have been a big fan of Hornady and use the 165BT for deer and loaded some 180 BT for my moose hunt last year. Unfortunately for me I did not see a moose. I also load right up to max loads with IMR 4350.
 

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When you go out west in the higher elevation you will find that you are going to even have a little less drop than you do now.

Also keep in mind that ballistic tables are established at certain bore to scope height differences(or just simple drop from barrel). And a different height scope will have different results. Tom.
 
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