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No. I tend to stay away from household type oils for my guns. Many of them dissolve into sort of a sticky film, especially wd-40.

I recommend weapons shield for moving parts, it's made in PA and is a fantastic lubricant. Check out some of the videos they have on youtube showing friction tests.

For rust prevention I usually just wipe down with a silicone cloth.
 

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Ballistol Multi-Purpose Aerosol Can Lubricant
 

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I use Birchwood Casey Barricade on both my modern guns and flintlocks.
 
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For rust preventive coating of firearms, I don't think its a bad choice, but for moving parts for all but used in extreme cold, I recommend white lithium automotive grease. I was given that recommendation from a gunsmith years ago when I asked about lubing the moving parts on one of my semi-auto rifles. I am glad I took his advice too. I have 30 year old rifles that have had thousands of rounds through them, and from using the grease the parts look almost like new.

Most guys fall victim to the less lube the better mentality on a semi-auto and then they wonder why their parts wear out so quickly. Of course with grease you don't want to over do it, just a light film. But even if you get a little liberal with it, it won't hurt. Grease when heated usually gets thin but still coats parts and lubes them. Thin watery gun oils when heated under the use of fast fired semi-autos, will quickly dry up leaving the metal parts exposed to excessive wear.

Now in extreme cold conditions then I say no do not use grease, in that case go to dry lubes like powdered graphite.
 

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I'd recommend Ballistol as well over other petroleum based oils.
 

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I would not put 3-in-1 oil on a firearm. I restore a lot of old things, from antique sewing machines to firearms, and stripping old oil...usually 3-in-1, that has turned to lacquer is a real pain. I recommend giving Grant Cunningham's article a read. I have been using the Lubriplate he recommends, almost exclusively, for a number of years. Occasionally, I use Rem Oil as a protectant since it is easier to get than Eezox, which is my favorite.

Lubrication 101: Gun oil, snake oil, and how to tell the difference. - www.GrantCunningham.com www.GrantCunningham.com
 

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I cleaned up a Remington 700 awhile back that had been sprayed down good with WD40 several years ago and then left in a closet.
 
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