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Discussion Starter #1
The recent flyer from Home Depot shows that Kingsford charcoal is on sale at 2 twenty pound bags for $12.88 .Pretty good one to start the smoking season . I know those racks of ribs will be on the smoker this weekend !!
 

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Don't use charcoal. When I cut a hickory, maple or oak down, I saw some prime branches into chunks ( about 2in x 2in) and do my bbq over a wood fire in the smoker grill. I usually make sure I have a 50 gal drum full for the following bbq season. Tastes so, so much better with that added wood smoke. (I save the 2 to 3 inch thick branches and cut them into chunks on the band saw. Te band saw table is just higher than the top of the drum, so it makes real quick work to saw the bbq chunks They season over the winter and are ready the next spring.

For all the BBQ we do, I'd go broke if I bought charcoal.

slow grilled a pork steak last Saturday. yams on the side with salad, MMMM
 

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A step down from cut wood is lump charcoal, I use that frequently since I don't have access to wood
 

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Discussion Starter #4
zim I am curious to hear how long a smoke you can get out of your method . I have found using the "minion" method with charcoal and wood chunks an overnight smoke can go 12 hours at 230 degrees without adding any more fuel . Must you add through the night or are you able to go that long without addition of wood when doing pork butts ?
 

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It depends on whether I want a cold smoke or hot smoke.

For a cold smoke there is a separate fire box and a stove pipe that takes the smoke to the smoker. in winter the smoke temp can be under 50 degrees and lasts a little over 12 hours. cold smoke is for things like cheese or bag sausage.

Normally I do a hot smoke. meaning the food cooks as it smokes. I take a 1.5 inch thick pork steak, coat it with olive oil and dry rub. Then I get a hot fire going on one side of the smoker. I put the steak on the hot side long enough to sear both sides and then move the steak to the side with out fire and close the lid. The temps go up to about 450 and then slowly go down over about 90 minutes. I cook it just until it is no longer pink inside, about 165 degrees. then it goes to the table.It is still juicy through and through.

One of my "dreams" is for my own closed pit bbq with a wood fired masonry bake oven beside it. The closed pit could double as a smoke house.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Zim , I see what you mean . So you cannot maintain a low and slow barbeque temperature at the normal 230 degrees for a prolonged period of time without refiring the unit .With my Weber Smokey Mountain I do use hickory and apple woods in combination with charcoal . The filled water pan helps to keep a very steady low temperature . Minor adjustments on the 3 lower vents allows for a steady temp up to 12 hours . Pork butts will smoke to an internal temperature of 205 degrees for pulling and take up to 16 hours at that barbecue temperature of 230 degrees . Sure worth it in the end with a very tasty bark from the rub . Getting hungry just thinking about it !!
 

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i use a wsm as well as the minion method. i put 3 or 4 chunks of apple wood in the bottom, cover with kingsford and about 15 lit kingsford briquets on top of that. fill the pan with water and throw 3-4 pork shoulders in at around 10pm. holds all night at 250-ish. next morning its done and i foil it and stick in fridge til about 3. heat in oven, pull it and its the best i've had. and i've lived all over the south and been eating Q for 30+ years. of course it gets a secret rub and finishing sauce and served with my own bbq sauce as well. mmmm mmmm good.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Pump, sounds great ! By the way , there are no secrets on here ....especially when it comes to rubs and sauces .
Yummo !!
 

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PossumBackstrap said:
A step down from cut wood is lump charcoal, I use that frequently since I don't have access to wood
Whole lump is all I use. There's a place near me that sells a #40 bag for $20.00. I've even found old cut nails in it from time to time. They must use old barn oak to make it.
 
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