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Discussion Starter #1
Been wanting to build a flintlock for quite awhile and I think I'm finally going to pull the trigger. Pretty much had my heart set on building a hawken, but I've heard this is one of the hardest guns to build. Can anyone tell me why this is? Quite a bit of drill press work perhaps? I'm not going to be scared away after reading this, just curious.
 

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I don't see any problem. Is it a kit ready to do some finish work on and assemble or a box of parts and a piece of wood or precarved stock?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Think I'm going to order a preserve from track of the wolf. Order all the parts individually from there actually. Not going for an exact replica, just a hunting rifle so I'd like to mix and match what catches my eye.
 

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I got a great shooting round ball barrel for a TC Hawken and decided to re-stock it in maple with an inlet stock from Petaconia. I have been playing around with a few small projects to test the artificial tiger striping finish so I haven't started my stock yet. Going to go with all steel. I am not a big fan of brass. This should make a great gun especially with the L&R lock.
 

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I got a great shooting round ball barrel for a TC Hawken and decided to re-stock it in maple with an inlet stock from Petaconia. I have been playing around with a few small projects to test the artificial tiger striping finish so I haven't started my stock yet. Going to go with all steel. I am not a big fan of brass. This should make a great gun especially with the L&R lock.
Rugered, that's how I started my journey into gun building. I have a TC renegade that I've done quite a bit of work on... upgraded to an L&R lock and a Davis deerslayer trigger, but of which required a fair it of inletting. Also stripped the stock, slimmed it down a fair bit and refinished it. Added a ghost ring sight as well. Made a huge difference in how it shoots, but now I'm ready to build one of my own!
 

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Drill press work? I don't even own a drill press. Not something needed to stock a rifle.


Hawkens are said to be difficult because most of the commercially available parts aren't historically accurate. They are kinda sorta but generic. That doesn't sound like it's of importance for you.


The only "difficulty" you'll have is the buttplate. The cresent and the return make it more difficult than a wider flatter butt plate.





I started down the rabbit hole in a similar way with a similar gun. After getting into long rifles, that short, heavy, painful rifle doesn't interest me much anymore. At the time, I thought the rifle I planned was everything I wanted. It's crazy accurate. It's killed my biggest buck. But if I had a do over, I'd started differently.


Good luck!
 

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Do yourself a favor and handle and or shoot some swamped barreled long rifles. You may change your mind on building a hawken.
 

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I was going to build a Hawken when I built my first muzzleloader since most everyone I knew was shooting a T/C or CVA Hawken. The fellow that was teaching the class I took suggested I build a long rifle. Since the long rifles typically have much more adornments, like relief carving, brass inlays, incised carving, wire inlay etc., his thought was that if you built one of those first then you could certainly build a hawken which is usually planer. I listened to him and was glad I did. About the only thing that was new when I built the hawken was pouring the ramrod entry with melted pewter. The brass one on the long rifle was inletted. For the amount of time you'll invest in building a rifle I would get the prettiest piece of wood that you can.
 
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