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Discussion Starter #1
This afternoon we hit a local Sunday School Chapel that was built in 1898. Its probably only a little over a quarter acre.

We were there 2 weeks ago and kind of cherry picked it. Then we had $2.03 in clad and I had a 1906 IH penny and a bald Buffalo nickel.

Today we dug more signals than just cherry picking but only had 89 cents in clad along with the usual trash. I also dug a 1935 wheatie and an 1890 IH penny. But my girlfriend outdid me today. She had a 1903 V nickel, an 1893 Barber quarter, and 2 IH pennies - 1904 and 1907.

An enjoyable 2 hours with great weather.
 

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sounds like a good time...congratulations on your finds!
 

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You experienced guys should also include in your posts, the rarity of such finds, possibly with current market prices of the finds. It would add to the intrigue to folks such as me that has an interest in your hobby, yet, knows little of the finds you all make.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Fleroo said:
You experienced guys should also include in your posts, the rarity of such finds, possibly with current market prices of the finds. It would add to the intrigue to folks such as me that has an interest in your hobby, yet, knows little of the finds you all make.
Unless you nail a nice heavy piece of jewelry or a key date coin, it isn’t the value or rarity of the find but the thrill of the hunt. It’s like running a trap line – it’s the anticipation of what might be waiting for you as you hear the clank of the trap chain as you’re rounding the bend. It’s that same anticipation when a strong tone goes off in the headphone and you begin to dig – anticipating what is going to be in the bottom of that hole.

Many dug coins are in rather poor condition with low value. But there’s a certain satisfaction when you unearth a coin, no matter the condition, that’s been in the ground for 100+ years.

Anyway, my girlfriend’s Barber quarter (I forgot to mention it’s an “s” mint) is in decent condition and has a value of about $25.00 on one of the sites I looked at. The current silver melt value for a quarter is $6.28.

The other coins we found that day – I’d probably be happy with a few bucks for all of them.

But after all of this talk about simple satisfaction and the thrill of the hunt – given a choice, I’ll take a new gold ring over a 100-year-old Indian Head penny any day.
 

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I find that I wayyyyyyyyyy over-value older, relic type items. When I watch Antique Roadshow (my favorite), I'm always shocked at how little some of the items are valued. Pristine Confederate Sword with scabbard, found in an attic, couple grand for example.

Seems as though Colonial type furniture in nice shape fetches a decent buck though. You guys ever unearth any Colonial type furniture with those MD's ?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Fleroo, you were asking for values on our finds.

Well, a few weeks ago I dug a Post Office Box key. I stopped at the Post Office desk this morning and turned it in for the $1.00 deposit.

A buck is a buck.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Stopped by the Chapel for a bit today.

Within 5 minutes – 2 IH pennies. Hey, this is going to be a great day…or so I thought.

For the next hour. Trash.
 
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