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I recently purchased a pair of Nikon Monarch 10x36 binoculars because i wanted to get a good pair for my Colorado Elk hunt in September but i will primarily be using them for archery hunting back here in PA. Most people are telling me i should have went with the 8x instead because of the clarity at closer distances. I ordered them online so I didn't get to try them out before i made the purchase. Will 10x be okay to use in PA woods?
 

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I use 10 x 50 Leupolds all the time.
 

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You should get a second pair of compact binocs for your archery hunting back east and keep your 10X36 for longer range hunting..You should try the Nikon Eagleview compacts which are high clarity at close range on the lower powers but you can zoom to higher powers also.They are very light and handy for archery hunting..
 

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To me binoculars were always a non-essential item to be carried out in the woods, only adding to the total weight of my load....Instead, I always prefer to have a nice pair along in the truck for checking out fields..After years of fussing both at home and out west, I have come to the conclusion that a set of 12 X 50 binoc's are what I need...10x50's just don't do it for the far stuff, especially out west.
 

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I have an ultra compact pair of 8x focus free glasses I got from Brookstone YEARS ago. I have NO idea who makes them...but when it comes to packing light in archery season my compacts get the nod over my 10x's every time. I have a pair of Carson Optical 10x42's that are VERY clear, but when it comes to hiking up into a tree, i try to keep my gear bag small and light. the Brookstone's weigh less than half of what my carsons weigh and are adequate for the shorter ranges I use for the tight woods. I like the carson's when the leaves drop and i can see longer distances.
 

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DrewMc said:
I recently purchased a pair of Nikon Monarch 10x36 binoculars because i wanted to get a good pair for my Colorado Elk hunt in September but i will primarily be using them for archery hunting back here in PA. Most people are telling me i should have went with the 8x instead because of the clarity at closer distances. I ordered them online so I didn't get to try them out before i made the purchase. Will 10x be okay to use in PA woods?
I have 8's and 10x Monarchs.....I use the 10x all the time!
 

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I use 12 X eveywhere now and really like them ,but if i buy a new pair they will be variable ,,nikon makes a 8x24x25
 

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Copied from a site:

"Choose this first number carefully (magnification) - more is not always better and this is especially true of magnification. As magnification goes up, image brightness goes down, field of view (the amount of territory seen through the binocular) goes down and, just as importantly, image steadiness also goes down. In fact, image steadiness is the limiting factor on how much magnification can be used in a handheld binocular. This is because a binocular magnifies not only the image, but also every shake and tremble in your hands. In general, most people find that a 10x binocular is the highest magnification that can be comfortably steadied without a support. Anything higher than a first number of 10x requires additional support, usually in the form of a tripod".

You'll notice a difference in image shakiness between an 8X and 10X. At least I do. I guess it depends on how steady you can be.
 

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Last year, I bought a pair of 10x42 Nikon Monarchs. I think their design, compared to my old Leupolds, allows me to steady them better. They just see to fit my hands nicely.

I do like the extra magnification and they are brighter than my 9x35's.

Nice, moderately priced piece of glass.
 

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I have used 6 or 8 power binoculars for many years. Five or six years ago I bought a small Nikon 10X. I liked the extra power. Two years ago I bought a quality pair of 10 x 42 and they are fantastic. I use them for everything including archery. I have never felt the extra power was a detriment but more an asset as long as you buy quality.
 

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I am looking for a new set of binoculars. Probably in the 8 X range.
Has anyone ever bought or used optics mae by Barska? They are always in the Sportsman's Guide.
 

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It depends on the quality of the glass. With high quality glass I love my 10x power for PA archery and scouting. If it was only for archery deer and it was lower quality glass I would purchase 8x. Since I use my binoculars more for scouting or rifle hunting I like the 10x. With archery binos are as important unless you are in a field or its the late season. during normal archery if you are using binos you have a better chance of being seen and that defeats the purpose.
 

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What pointer said. higher power means you must buy higher quality.
Also, if you are holding the glasses for a long time, then higher power tires your eyes and your your arms.

I have 8x 40 B & L for most everything, about 25 years old. Been to Africa, Alaska and lots of tough places, never though I needed more power for hunting. I use 10x for birding.
 

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Sgt Rick said:
Has anyone ever bought or used optics mae by Barska? They are always in the Sportsman's Guide.
Barska are a low quality optic. Check out the Optics section of the 24 Hour Campground website for opinions on binoculars.
 

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Forgot. The first number is the power, the second number is the objective lens diameter in mm. so a 7x35 is an 7 power with a 35mm objective lens (front).

You must have a 5:1 ratio. so get 7x35 or 8x40 or 10x50.
It has to do with the diameter of your pupil. And smaller objective means you are not going to get the most light on your retina. This means nothing at noon, but in early morning and evening, your binoc will not gather enough light and targets will be much darker.

All optics manufacturers know this and the good one will be available in that range. Lower cost manufacturers cut corners to give cheap higher power binoculars with smaller objective lens (lower costs), they are no bargain.
 

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Thanks for the tip about 24 Hour Campfire. Went there and stayed for almost an hour just reading posts. Good info. Also looked at prices from a sponsor there. Pretty good prices for optics.
 
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