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Discussion Starter #1
Manure spill kills fish in 2 streams

ENVIRONMENT

Williams Run, East Branch of Octoraro Creek impacted

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A manure storage facility on a farm in Sadsbury Township near Christiana Borough failed early Monday, sending an estimated 100,000 gallons of manure into two streams, killing fish.

The state Department of Environmental Protection said the manure reached both the nearby Williams Run and, eventually, the East Branch of Octoraro Creek.

The pollution incident originated on the farm of Melvin Zook on Buck Hill Road near Christiana, DEP said. The manure facility was under a barn and had a capacity of 150,000 gallons.

DEP and a waterways conservation officer for the Fish and Boat Commission were on the scene Monday. Dead

fish were found in Williams Run near Christiana, according to DEP.

Also on the scene was a representative of the Chester Water Authority. The East Branch of Octoraro Creek feeds the Octoraro Reservoir, which supplies drinking water to 200,000 people in parts of




The East Branch of Octoraro Creek has been impacted by a manure spill.

FILE PHOTO



Manure: Streams affected

Chester and Delaware counties.

Drinking water supply not affected

The authority is closely monitoring the pollution, but “there has been no adverse effect to the water quality in the Octoraro Reservoir at this time, and there is no disruption in service to our customers,” spokesman Mike D’Agostino told LNP Tuesday.

DEP was onsite Tuesday to document stream conditions and the progress of the

cleanup.

No injuries were reported, and no livestock was lost from the failure of the manure storage facility, DEP said.

In October 2017, a manure storage structure ruptured on a farm in Pequea Township, sending more than 200,000 gallons of manure and contaminated water into a creek that drains into the Susquehanna River. The spill caused a fish kill on Stehman Run.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I hope so, it takes a while before these things get settled, you have the Fish and Boat Commission and the DEP both have jurisdiction.
 

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After the fine handed down to Bruner Island last week from their last fish kill on the Susquehanna, I see a triple digit fine coming their way.
Fines have been averaging 2-3$ per fish killed..
 

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Discussion Starter #9
We just had another manure spill in Lancaster Co. into a creek yesterday, 2000 gallons this time.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
We just had another manure spill into a creek yesterday, 2000 gallons this time.
 

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What's odd about the fines levied on the Brunner's Island generating plant, is that they generally have to do with water temperature issues.

No pollution, just a sudden change in discharge water temps, that sometimes kill fish that tend to congregate where the river water is normally warmer anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Denny, they are required to keep the water temp within certain parameters so they don't kill fish that move to the warm water discharge to feed on the bait that moves there as well. This isn't the first fish kill Brunners was responsible for. They have made a lot of enemies recently when they totally closed off an area that was open to the public for a long long time, that a lot of people used for fishing, river watching and just plain to relax. The suspicion is, they don't want the public to see some of the stuff they are doing.
 

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I believe there are a lot more of these spills that go unreported... Lines freeze up and **** overflows down to the unnamed trib. out back. The only reason these got reported is because the first was simply too large to deny and wall failures were involved, which are a bit tricky to hide.
 

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I'm not an expert on --. Though I can talk it.
These guys that have tanks and storage areas under barns or on property should have to disperse the poop as fertilizer on the fields or move it to someone that will within a certain limit or time. I've read several stories where kids or others have fallen into to these things. The guys on the Chesapeake Bay have blamed PA farmers for years that we are killing their fish. And we probably are.
Company I worked for dumped some stuff in a Class A trout stream. Killed everything for some distance. Not good.
 

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Reason for the tanks is to store the stuff till conditions are right. Can't spread on snow. You need to spread when plants can take in nutrients. Spread to soon or to much and it (npk) is washed away or burned off by the sun.

Farms all should have plans on file to deal with manure if they receive funding. The plans are very detailed, but only a suggestion unless you are a documented violator or a farm with 2 many animals. Very soon I see that all changing. Plans will be enforced and way more fines being issued.
 

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They don't spread it on frozen ground because it doesn't sink into the soil but washes off, it doesn't have to do with the nutrients not being available. I don't think they are allowed to spread slurry on frozen ground because of the run off. That is why they have so much in their digesters this time of the year. It will be in the ground when the plants need it just like other fertilizers and lime. I don't think some of these guys are doing inspections and maintenance of their storage tanks until after they have a leak.
 

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They don't spread it on frozen ground because it doesn't sink into the soil but washes off, it doesn't have to do with the nutrients not being available. I don't think they are allowed to spread slurry on frozen ground because of the run off. That is why they have so much in their digesters this time of the year. It will be in the ground when the plants need it just like other fertilizers and lime. I don't think some of these guys are doing inspections and maintenance of their storage tanks until after they have a leak.
They spread it on frozen ground every day
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Perhaps, but this is the law.


View of manure spreader in field STAY LEGAL! In some Northeast states, this common winter-time practice would now be illegal.
LIVESTOCK>MANURE
If you have to spread manure this winter, keep it legal
Winter manure spreading is illegal in most Northeast states, except for emergency exemptions.
Feb 14, 2018


Due to environmental concerns and nutrient losses, most Northeast states prohibit winter manure spreading without emergency exemptions, and only by following specific requirements. Some states have outlawed it altogether; others have differing definitions for winter.

Nonetheless, wintertime spreading is under intense scrutiny due to elevated risks for nutrient losses and its effect on water quality. So if it’s absolutely unavoidable, make sure you have clearance beforehand.


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For Pennsylvania, winter is defined as any of the following three conditions:

1. Between Dec. 15 and Feb. 28

2. Any time the ground is snow covered

3. Any time the soil is frozen 4 inches or deeper

The dos and don’ts
The following guidelines must be followed by farms operating under a Manure Management Plan, which are typically smaller, less intensive operations. Concentrated animal feeding operations that are permitted or regulated under Act 38 should consult their Nutrient Management Plan to determine allowable winter spreading practices.

• Do: Maintain a setback of 100 feet’ from streams, lakes, ponds, sinkholes, drinking water wells, and aboveground inlets to ag drainage systems. Setbacks allowed in other seasons by implementing best management practices don’t apply during winter.

• Don’t: Spread on slopes greater than 15%. These would be soils listed with “D” or “E” codes on a soil survey map.

• Do: Limit winter application rates to the following: 5,000 gallons per acre of liquid manure; 20 tons per acre of solid non-poultry manure; 3 tons per acre of solid poultry manure. Alternatively, you can use a nutrient balance sheet to determine the phosphorus balanced rate of manure for the next crop and apply equal to or less than that rate.


• Don’t: Spread on fields with less than 25% crop residue cover unless a cover crop has been planted there. Corn silage and low yielding soybean fields typically have less than 25% residue cover during the winter.

• Do: Prioritize winter spreading on fields with living plant cover, such as cover crops, hay fields or pastures. Plants in these fields help prevent nutrient losses by taking up nitrogen into plant biomass and more effectively preventing erosion.

Winter spreading is now a last resort — and only if legal. If that’s your situation, it’s time to increase your operation’s manure storage capacity. For more information about writing a Manure Management Plan, visit the Nutrient Management Education Program page.

Source: Penn State Extension
 
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