Decline in songbird population - The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community
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post #1 of 34 (permalink) Old 10-11-2019, 10:45 PM Thread Starter
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Decline in songbird population

In the recent issue of Outdoor News there was an article about the decline of the songbird population of nearly 30 percent in the last 50 years. It was mentioned that global warming and habitat loss are probable causes.

This was brought up on the Feral Cat thread when two posters mentioned that the decline is much steeper and larger. One was me and it has been noticed and commented on by me and my neighbors. The other poster had the same experience to report.

In my case, I would estimate the drop is more like 60-70 percent in the last 2-3 years. The suggestion was made that a drop this big and quick could be caused by a disease.

I started this thread to determine how widespread this type of decline in population is and is the cause a disease or something else. Global warming and habitat change would not work this quick.
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post #2 of 34 (permalink) Old 10-12-2019, 05:34 AM
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the decline is bad. there is another thread about this & I noted how I have gone from filling the feeder

2 or 3 times a week to once a week.

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post #3 of 34 (permalink) Old 10-12-2019, 06:34 AM
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Due to drawing bears, I don't start up the bird feeders until rifle deer season is over. I end it about mid February for the same reason. In past years the traffic has been heavy. I'm not doubting other peoples experiences. Maybe the practice of feeding birds itself has led to a decline? Wouldn't that be something!

Whenever global warming is mentioned, I become suspect of any new crisis. I agree that a disease is more likely.
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post #4 of 34 (permalink) Old 10-12-2019, 06:57 AM
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On the subject of declines, I saw more Monarch Butterflies this summer than I have over the past couple of years.
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post #5 of 34 (permalink) Old 10-12-2019, 07:38 AM
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There is concern that neonicotinoid pesticides might harm to bees and song birds.

https://scholar.google.com/scholar?q...=1&oi=scholart

I will prepare and someday my chance will come. - Abraham Lincoln

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post #6 of 34 (permalink) Old 10-12-2019, 08:10 AM
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A while ago I posted a similar item but not sure if it was on this site. Since then I still have not seen a lot of birds. Sure some, but not many at all.
I am not a sky-is-falling person but this bothers me as they are important parts of our ecosystem. Maybe it's a cycle?

Also noticed that the dozen or so squirrels I had in the yard at the feeder have been reduced to 1.

Good night Chesty, wherever you are......
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post #7 of 34 (permalink) Old 10-12-2019, 08:34 AM
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https://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/n...eeds-1.5281002

In this Canadian study they fed about a dozen birds with each of two different low doses of nicotinoids laced oil, and gave untreated oil to another dozen for comparison. They observed the birds for about six hours, then released them with tiny tags on their backs. The tags send a signal as the birds fly past receiving towers dotted across the region.

The wild birds also experienced loss of appetite and weight loss, and tended to spend an average of 3.5 days recovering before continuing their migration.The good news was that once they did, they had no trouble going in the right direction, even though lab studies suggested that neonics affect birds' ability to orient themselves.

The researchers think wild birds just don't fly until that effect wears off.

They noted that hunkering down to recover could leave the birds more vulnerable to predators or extreme weather. And the delay itself could have more serious negative impacts.

neonicotinoids, (nicotine) are used in growing sunflowers and millet at planting. It remains in the seed.

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post #8 of 34 (permalink) Old 10-12-2019, 08:48 AM
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I ran into a couple ANF employees at CCSF and they were studying tweety birds. They were catching and banding them. They told me that there is a Japanese fruit fly and the females were laying her eggs in berries and that is effecting the fruit eating birds. But I don't think that explains what happened at my bird feeder. Could be wrong.

Curley, I have a sunflower bird feeder that I hang well out of reach of bears (I have a trail cam on my deck and get pictures of bears trying to reach it with no avail), SOL bears. The suet which attracts woodpeckers and nuthatches, I bring in every night.

I feed birds a foot off one of my windows (so I get a close up view) all year long and they came to the feeder from day light to dark, I even get flying squirrels at night. This year most birds completely disappeared. I still get cardinals at dawn and dusk along with a few nuthatches during the day at the sunflower feeder. The many, many chickadees, titmouse and finches that frequented the sunflower feeder, disappeared all at once. I used to feed them a 2 gallon jug of sunflower everyday. This has happened to others I have talked with too. I'm puzzled and as rocky said I leaning to disease. Buy the way, I clean my feeders once a week every week. I don't think it is bad feed as the cardinals and nuthatches eat it. I'm puzzled...
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post #9 of 34 (permalink) Old 10-12-2019, 08:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockyDD View Post
In the recent issue of Outdoor News there was an article about the decline of the songbird population of nearly 30 percent in the last 50 years. It was mentioned that global warming and habitat loss are probable causes.

This was brought up on the Feral Cat thread when two posters mentioned that the decline is much steeper and larger. One was me and it has been noticed and commented on by me and my neighbors. The other poster had the same experience to report.

In my case, I would estimate the drop is more like 60-70 percent in the last 2-3 years. The suggestion was made that a drop this big and quick could be caused by a disease.

I started this thread to determine how widespread this type of decline in population is and is the cause a disease or something else. Global warming and habitat change would not work this quick.
Yeah because there is NO global warming crap!
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post #10 of 34 (permalink) Old 10-12-2019, 09:32 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightblaster View Post
There is concern that neonicotinoid pesticides might harm to bees and song birds.

https://scholar.google.com/scholar?q...=1&oi=scholart

This. Pesticides, herbicides, fungicides, chemical fertilizers. We are just now beginning to see what decades of using these poisons will do. Global warming is a joke. Climate change has always been going on but it is not caused by man. BUT spraying poisons all over the ground, our water and our wildlife is and always was a bad idea. Put your roundup away boys and use natural methods and fertilizers.


I haven't filled my feeders in over a week. Birds are just not around. Not good.

Listen, or your tongue will make you deaf.

"When a pine needle falls in the forest, the eagle sees it, the deer hears it, and the bear smells it."
an old First Nations saying

Last edited by Buckskin Dave; 10-12-2019 at 09:40 AM.
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