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post #1 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-13-2014, 01:40 PM Thread Starter
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Research: Coyote Predation on Deer Manageable

Coyotes are a major predator of white-tailed deer across the East, especially fawns born each spring, but wildlife managers nonetheless are able to stabilize and even grow deer herds, according to researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.

Coyotes -- Canis latrans -- are a relatively recent arrival to eastern North America, appearing first in the region in noticeable numbers in the 1970s. They are a significant source of deer mortality and most often prey on whitetails in the earliest months of their lives. Coyotes have long inhabited the American West.

With the range expansion of coyotes eastward, and their crossbreeding with gray wolves (Canis lupus) along the way, Eastern coyotes are larger than their Western counterparts. Many people are concerned that their predation may be adversely affecting Eastern deer populations. Recently, lawmakers in Pennsylvania proposed placing a bounty on coyotes to incentivize their destruction for the sake of deer.

In response to those concerns, researchers initiated a study to look at deer and coyote populations from southeastern Canada through the mid-Atlantic region to the Southeast. Using published study data from throughout eastern North America that included fawn mortality, adult doe survival and reproductive rates -- and even the effects of severe winter weather on deer survival and predation -- researchers studied how deer populations responded to changes in predation and hunter harvest.

The research, published in the May issue of the Journal of Wildlife Management, aimed to determine whether managers can compensate for coyote predation of white-tailed deer.

"The concern is that coyotes may be changing the established population dynamics of white-tailed deer herds through increased predation on fawns," said Duane Diefenbach, adjunct professor of wildlife ecology and leader of the Pennsylvania Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit based at Penn State. "If that's true, then deer managers need to adjust how they make harvest-management decisions, because manipulating doe harvests is typically how wildlife agencies maintain, increase or decrease deer populations."

The study showed that coyote predation -- even at the highest levels reported -- is not significant enough to cause deer populations to decline if doe harvests are reduced. In fact, in most places in North America, continued doe harvest is required to stabilize deer populations.

Diefenbach said the only place in which that might not be true is the Southeast, where wildlife managers have found the highest predation rates on fawns by coyotes. In that region, an average of only one in four fawns survives to three months of age. But that is only in combination with extremely low doe-survival rates.

"However, we couldn't find any published research on adult-doe-survival rates in the Southeast, so it is possible that if doe hunting were stopped, deer populations would stabilize despite the heavy predation."

Mortality of white-tailed deer fawns is significant across the East, Diefenbach noted. Only an average of one in two survives its first three months of life, which is when most mortality occurs. Predation by coyotes, black bears and bobcats accounts for most mortality. Regardless, the number of fawns that survive generally is adequate to sustain nearly all populations.

"Besides predators, the other major source of mortality in fawns is hunting,” said Diefenbach. “Thus, reduced hunting can be used to offset mortality from natural predators. Enough fawns survive all sources of mortality that we still need to harvest antlerless deer to maintain stable deer populations. There is little evidence to date that the increase in coyote predation could create a crisis that could not be solved by wildlife managers simply responding with reductions in antlerless deer harvests."

Contributing to the research were Kelly Robinson and Angela Fuller, New York Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Natural Resources, Cornell University; Jeremy Hurst, New York Department of Environmental Conservation, Division of Fish, Wildlife, and Marine Resources; and Christopher Rosenberry, Bureau of Wildlife Management, Pennsylvania Game Commission.


http://news.psu.edu/story/315340/2014/05...east-manageable

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post #2 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-13-2014, 02:35 PM
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Re: Research: Coyote Predation on Deer Manageable

"The study showed that coyote predation -- even at the highest levels reported -- is not significant enough to cause deer populations to decline if doe harvests are reduced. In fact, in most places in North America, continued doe harvest is required to stabilize deer populations."

If doe harvests are reduced being the key words. Ultimately the goal of the antis is to increase predation via the protection and re-introduction of predators which will result in less of a need for hunting.

I support all hunters, regardless of weapon or technique!
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post #3 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-13-2014, 03:11 PM
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Re: Research: Coyote Predation on Deer Manageable

Same idea used for smallgame, let the predators lower the populations, and keep the human hunters out. As with small game hunters, deer hunter numbers will drop with less game. My thought would be try to control predation numbers so hunter harvest increases. Human hunters pay to hunt and this money is used to help wildlife. Support an anti save a predator. With pretty much an open season now on coyotes and the numbers high it will be hard to reduce their numbers.
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post #4 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-13-2014, 03:30 PM
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Re: Research: Coyote Predation on Deer Manageable

Quote:
Originally Posted by Penn State, PGC
Many people are concerned that their predation may be adversely affecting Eastern deer populations.
Define “adversely affecting”.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Penn State, PGC
The study showed that coyote predation -- even at the highest levels reported -- is not significant enough to cause deer populations to decline if doe harvests are reduced.
This is not a NEW study, this is a review of the EXISTING data. No one knows predation rates today in PA.

Regardless, this is a fascinating acknowledgment by Penn State & PGC that predation is taking away from hunters the former higher yields of game. For years we were told that coyotes do not affect deer populations, now we are told they do. Do you believe me now?

Why have no remedies been offered? No alternate to a coyote bounty. No talk of reducing bear density. No tools for landowners/managers like Kip to help mitigate. Nothing. Are we hunters expected to just take it?

I’m telling you, the goal has shifted from one that manages the resource for production, to one where wildlife is simply “watched” to be sure it does not disappear. Do you believe me now?

Wildlife is a renewable resource to be managed for consumption.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Duane Diefenbach
"Besides predators, the other major source of mortality in fawns is hunting,” said Diefenbach. “Thus, reduced hunting can be used to offset mortality from natural predators. Enough fawns survive all sources of mortality that we still need to harvest antlerless deer to maintain stable deer populations. There is little evidence to date that the increase in coyote predation could create a crisis that could not be solved by wildlife managers simply responding with reductions in antlerless deer harvests."
Excuse me, but the “crisis” IS the reduced hunting.

Why would anyone anywhere believe such nonsense propaganda that predation could wipe out a species???

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post #5 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-13-2014, 03:57 PM
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Re: Research: Coyote Predation on Deer Manageable

This study places it's findings on just the coyote. How does the collective of coyote, bear, bobcat, and the winged varieties adjust hunting?

No problem! We can compensate with lower bag limits.
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post #6 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-13-2014, 04:39 PM
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Re: Research: Coyote Predation on Deer Manageable

Man manipulates everything to his liking so that being said if predator numbers are growing they are supposed to grow.
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post #7 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-13-2014, 05:04 PM
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Re: Research: Coyote Predation on Deer Manageable


Mortality of white-tailed deer fawns is significant across the East, Diefenbach noted. Only an average of one in two survives its first three months of life, which is when most mortality occurs. Predation by coyotes, black bears and bobcats accounts for most mortality. Regardless, the number of fawns that survive generally is adequate to sustain nearly all populations.


It mentions them all in Pa Curly.
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post #8 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-13-2014, 06:35 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Research: Coyote Predation on Deer Manageable

May 19th (Monday) at the working group meeting staff will present the outline of a coyote / predation study.


Just a FYI -

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post #9 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-13-2014, 07:41 PM
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Re: Research: Coyote Predation on Deer Manageable

Quote:
Originally Posted by dce
Mortality of white-tailed deer fawns is significant across the East, Diefenbach noted. Only an average of one in two survives its first three months of life, which is when most mortality occurs. Predation by coyotes, black bears and bobcats accounts for most mortality. Regardless, the number of fawns that survive generally is adequate to sustain nearly all populations.


It mentions them all in Pa Curly.
Thanks for the correction. I wonder how much it plays into the 1 week reduction of our fall turkey season in 3A this year?
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post #10 of 22 (permalink) Old 05-13-2014, 08:21 PM
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Re: Research: Coyote Predation on Deer Manageable

I would say the NC is pretty close to a anti deer hunting nirvana now. As RSB has said its the habitat controlling the deer population not hunters.
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