SA 1911 aftermarket upgrade - The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community
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post #1 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-16-2018, 06:50 AM Thread Starter
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SA 1911 aftermarket upgrade

I have a Springfield Armory 1911 Range Officer in .45 ACP. From a rest at 25 yards the gun is very accurate; in my hands, no so much but I am getting better as I practice and learn how to shoot the gun.
So my question is what aftermarket upgrades can I get to improve the trigger pull? I found several kits that are advertised as trigger pull improvement "drop-in" kits but I could use some guidance from folks with experience. And - if anyone has suggestions on other upgrades to the firearm I would like to hear about them as well.
Shooting 200 gr RN or RN/FP with 5.0 gr Win 231.

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post #2 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-16-2018, 09:39 AM
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Never had much luck with drop-in trigger kits for a 1911. Find a good gunsmith that has experience with building 1911s. There is much more to a trigger job than just dropping in a trigger kit. All the trigger parts need fit to each other and should be fit to the frame, disconnect, and pins etc. that hold the parts in-place. Basically, anything that touches the trigger/parts can have an effect on the pull weight and or feel, even the part you put your finger on. Do it right once and be done.

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post #3 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-16-2018, 10:06 AM
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A lot of practice in technique, breath control and the proper holding of your handgun will probably serve you better than playing around trying to change the trigger pull. The fact that it shoots well from the bench when you have a rest kinda shows it is more you than the gun. Handgun shooting is a lot like shooting a bow, you need to do the same thing every time, the grip the stance and the trigger squeeze. You need to develop muscle memory shooting a handgun just like with a bow. Once you do that it just takes enough shooting to brush up on your technique. Rather than looking for a trigger job, I would find someone who is good with a handgun to teach you, they can show you the proper way and then watch you shoot and coach you until it falls into place. I found shooting the weaver technique is a much better platform that shooting Isosceles technique. It allows you to hold the gun more steady and gun movement is what creates bad shooting. It will not matter how good the trigger pull is on your gun if you are not using the proper hold, stance and trigger pull. Seemingly small things like how much finger you place on the trigger can make a big difference. Just some suggestions from someone who was a handgun instructor for 25 years.

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Last edited by Woods walker; 05-16-2018 at 10:09 AM.
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post #4 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-16-2018, 02:38 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Woods walker View Post
A lot of practice in technique, breath control and the proper holding of your handgun will probably serve you better than playing around trying to change the trigger pull. The fact that it shoots well from the bench when you have a rest kinda shows it is more you than the gun. Handgun shooting is a lot like shooting a bow, you need to do the same thing every time, the grip the stance and the trigger squeeze. You need to develop muscle memory shooting a handgun just like with a bow. Once you do that it just takes enough shooting to brush up on your technique. Rather than looking for a trigger job, I would find someone who is good with a handgun to teach you, they can show you the proper way and then watch you shoot and coach you until it falls into place. I found shooting the weaver technique is a much better platform that shooting Isosceles technique. It allows you to hold the gun more steady and gun movement is what creates bad shooting. It will not matter how good the trigger pull is on your gun if you are not using the proper hold, stance and trigger pull. Seemingly small things like how much finger you place on the trigger can make a big difference. Just some suggestions from someone who was a handgun instructor for 25 years.
Being a longbow shooter I appreciate the analogy relative to doing the same thing every time. Had to look up what the Weaver and Isosceles techniques are and it turns out that I have been using a bastardized version of the Weaver stance without knowing it. Need to incorporate the finer points of the technique; bending the knees for example - just like in shooting a longbow. And I have a standing offer from a former instructor to help me out and which I am now going to take advantage of. Thanks much.

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post #5 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-16-2018, 03:08 PM
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Great, I am glad you found an instructor. Once you find out what you need to work on, things will progress.
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post #6 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-18-2018, 05:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woods walker View Post
A lot of practice in technique, breath control and the proper holding of your handgun will probably serve you better than playing around trying to change the trigger pull. The fact that it shoots well from the bench when you have a rest kinda shows it is more you than the gun. .
To a point. I would advise that you give the current trigger a try for some time before jumping to the conclusion that it needs a trigger job. Also, try out your instructors gun. My point is that you need allot more experience with different triggers before you are knowledgeable to judge a good one from a not so good one. Horrible ones are obvious, but I don?t think you are in that boat because of the way you said it was already shooting from a rest.

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I found shooting the weaver technique is a much better platform that shooting Isosceles technique. It allows you to hold the gun more steady and gun movement is what creates bad shooting.
Your mileage may vary. I did the opposite and moved to the isosceles stance because I found it better for my style of shooting. Try them both. I will say that you very rarely see the pure Weaver stance used by any of the current crop of top performers in any of the action pistol sports any more. But again, I'm very different than the OP because 90% of my shooting is DAO revolver work. Heck...should I admit...I no longer own a SA 1911

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Need to incorporate the finer points of the technique; bending the knees for example - just like in shooting a longbow.
And yes, knees should be slightly bent and you should not be leaning back on your heels. I find that to be one of the most often made mistake by beginners. I tell people that you need to be ?into it?, instead of looking like you?re going to be falling backwards!

And since you sound like a beginner, I highly recommend getting a .22 with a similar trigger and action as your 1911 or even a .22 conversion top end for your gun. Nothing beats cheap trigger time!

Good luck.

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post #7 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-18-2018, 05:09 PM
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If you haven't yet, google the correction wheel for pistol shooters. It'll help.

Now, that said, I'll share a bit of personal experience.

I was shooting "not terrible" groups of about 3" offhand at 15 yards. Nothing to brag about, but to the average guy at the range I was a pro, lol.

Anywho, these groups were ALWAYS somewhere in the 8-10 o'clock realm relative to my point of aim. The correction wheel's advice made a little improvement, but most of the issue remained.

It took about 200 rounds of trial and error until I FORCED myself to SLOW. DOWN. Focus on my trigger pull. REALLY focus on how I broke the trigger. I mean...painstaking, very intense "when is it breaking, am I clean/flinching/etc". Very very slow fire.

And like magic.....rounds came right on target.

Trigger pull is a bugger if you're not consistent with it. Focus on it. Hard. Shoot a lot..with a purpose. Not just making empty brass, but perfecting technique. I would dry fire a lot, then go to the range and shoot and focus on making things work just like in dry fire.

I can't shoot fast yet...but I can hit what I want to.
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post #8 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-18-2018, 05:56 PM
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One other thing, when you are shooting it is the front sight that should be crystal clear, not the bulls eye, your eyes can't focus on two things at the same time so what you are shooting at should be blurry, your front sight should be sharp.

When you are up to your butt in alligators, it is hard to remember your intent was to drain the swamp. Stay focused!
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post #9 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-18-2018, 07:38 PM
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Good advice from tdd. Dry fire as much as possible (every day). Your stance, first place to start, will be easier to master than trigger control. Work on both while dry firing. Shoot for accuracy first, speed will come.

P.S. Try not to get too addicted.
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post #10 of 27 (permalink) Old 05-18-2018, 07:44 PM
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As Bill Hickok said, "you can't miss fast enough to make up for poor marksmanship".

When you are up to your butt in alligators, it is hard to remember your intent was to drain the swamp. Stay focused!
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