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post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-20-2017, 12:43 PM Thread Starter
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Here and gone

Here and gone

Another summer has came and gone. It was good to me in many ways. I think I enjoyed my time on the water more this summer than ever before. I had a lot of new experiences on old streams, and found some new water as well. This will be a recap of my last few days.

Day 1- We have finally sunk into a low water period. Not an extremely low water period, but normal summer flows.

Vnkv by eric reger, on Flickr

I fish this stream once or twice each year. The number of wild fish has been increasing each year, although this stream isn’t listed as having wild fish. It isn’t stocked either. I assume it just hasn’t been surveyed in a while if ever.

I thought this was an interesting wild rainbow due to its lack of dots and coloration.
Vnkv by eric reger, on Flickr

This trout was interesting because of its lack of size.
Vnkv by eric reger, on Flickr

This 18” leftover from a spring stocking moved quite a ways upstream to find his wild kin folk.
Vnkv by eric reger, on Flickr

I planned on fishing up further than I ever had on this stream, but just past my normal stopping point, I ran into private property so my journey ended.

Day 2- I fished this steam one time in the past, two years ago and I have been hoping to get back soon.
Vnkv by eric reger, on Flickr

The last time I was here , I only caught 17 trout in 3 hours, but the conditions were pretty bad.

I immediately started picking up wild fish left and right. This is another stream that is not stocked and is not listed as having any wild fish.
Vnkv by eric reger, on Flickr

One of the high points of this trip was catching two nice wild browns on back to back casts of 14” and 13”. One came from the hole on the left of the intro picture for this stream, and the other came from the hole on the right.
Vnkv by eric reger, on Flickr

Vnkv by eric reger, on Flickr

The other highlight was a wild rainbow that had a pink underside.
Vnkv by eric reger, on Flickr

I guess overall it doesn’t look too much different, but that pink hue really caught my attention while landing this fish.

I did get to fish further up this stream than I did last time, but this loooong stretch of ankle deep water ahead of me helped me to end my trip. I fished 4 hours here and got 61 trout, which was much better than my first trip.
Vnkv by eric reger, on Flickr

Day 3-FINALLY! I was able to get back on the big water.
Vnkv by eric reger, on Flickr

The fish here haven’t seen clearly in weeks and they seemed eager to get some metal in their mouths.

Especially this 19” chunker of a brown.
Vnkv by eric reger, on Flickr

I only fish the river until the sun hits the water, which is usually around 9am. I just don’t like being in the full sun.

I moved on down the road to a nice coldwater stream that was flowing much better than I expected.
Vnkv by eric reger, on Flickr

This stream does get stocked, but the wild fish were present in greater numbers.
Vnkv by eric reger, on Flickr

Vnkv by eric reger, on Flickr

I did catch some wild brown trout too, but those photos were garbage.

I was near my planned ending point, and I pushed a few holes further “just in case” and I am glad that I did.

My biggest leftover stockie of the day came from my last spot, which was kindly posted as walk-in only fishing.
Vnkv by eric reger, on Flickr

The 20.5” brown came home with me. My wife always asks me to bring fish home, but its been a few years since I have. This was a great opportunity…last hole, heading home already, and a fish big enough that I could make a little meal out of just 1 fish. Plus with all the small wild fish, I felt ok taking this big guy out.

Shortly after leaving the stream, I passed a vista of all of the valleys that run together to create the stream I just fished. I have never fished the tributaries, but I’m sure that someone who reads this has fished them.
Vnkv by eric reger, on Flickr

Day 4- I just love this little stream. I have included it in a few write ups in the past. This rivulet ALWAYS has water. I have noticed in the last 5 years of meticulously watching precip data after storms, that this small, 4mile x 4mile area ALWAYS gets rain. If the surrounding area gets half in inch, it gets an inch and a half. Storms pop up here very regularly, even when they don’t pop up anywhere else in the area. There are some unique geographic features that lead to this, but to protect the identity of this stream, I will leave that info out…
Fvjk by eric reger, on Flickr
I’m sure a few other locals fish this stream, but I’m not sure they appreciate it as much as I do.


I caught two little natives before I even got my feet wet here. My first cast into a “big” hole caught me off guard when a big trout nipped my spinner without getting hooked. I tried another cast but got no follow on the spinner. And since I’m not too proud of a spinner fisher, and I wasn’t in a hurry, I cut my spinner off and tied a trout magnet on. The first cast got a strong tug, and the slender 17” leftover stockie with a mangled tail was landed in short order. I measured to the in-tact end of his tail.
Fvjk by eric reger, on Flickr

This was the only stocked fish of the day. There is a larger stream down about a mile from where I was that gets stocked heavily so I assume this was a migrant.

Before I tied my spinner back on, I pulled one more colorful little native from where the big fish dwelled. You can see the “big”, deep hole in the background.
Fvjk by eric reger, on Flickr


I had fished maybe 7 minutes so far and had 4 trout landed so my spirits were soaring. I stopped to gear up with a spinner again, and out of my peripheral vision, saw something heading quickly toward me on the bank. I did a quick draw of my camera, and was able to capture some of it on video… I also snapped some pictures.
Fvjk by eric reger, on Flickr

The mink was within arms reach of me for a few minutes as it hunted the rip rap on the bank. I made a few mouse squeak sounds and each time it would stop and look at me. Seeing how oblivious this creature was served as a minor blow to my mink trapping ego. I have the video posted on instagram @eastern_woodlands

As a mink trapper, I know that mink prefer to hunt on land, so the fishing might still be ok upstream. A concrete box culvert that normally holds a few nice trout was the only spot that was tampered with, as the mink had no other path than to go through the water.

At the two hour mark and to my amazement (lack of cell service) I received a call from my wife telling me a big storm was bearing down on the area. The forecast before I left said 30% chance of showers… I fished rapidly, trying to make it to the best hole on the stream before heading back to avoid getting caught in the storm.

Most of this stream is like a tunnel, with rhodo and mountain laurel growing over the water. I always look forward to this spot because I can finally stand erect. I really can’t picture anybody else fishing here. I brought a friend here once and he walked the bank 90% of the time and just popped into the stream sporadically when there was an opening. There is a lot of crawling in the water involved.
Fvjk by eric reger, on Flickr

Here is another view from the bank above. It really is a little oasis in a vast and dense expanse of vegetation.
Fvjk by eric reger, on Flickr

I caught 8 native trout from here. The biggest was a 12 ľ” native. I caught the first 4 fish here on a spinner, and after that stopped electing any reactions, I switched to a trout mag to pick up 4 more.
Fvjk by eric reger, on Flickr

I am almost certain that I have caught this fish at least twice in the past 3 years from the same spot. I tried to look back in photobucket for the picture of this fish from last year and the year before, but the site was not loading. I pushed the envelope and waited til I caught 50 trout before leaving after 2.5 hours. The deluge came shortly after I started driving home. I caught 6 native brook trout this summer over 12". I haven't even fished my best stream for big natives yet. I really hope to get there this year.

I’m back to work next week. I usually get 4-5 more trips in after I go back. Each year I say that I will do more fall trout fishing, but I never do. I am saying that again this year. I always waste too much time sitting in tree stands in early October when I should be fishing. I have harvested a buck each of the last 5 years from the same tree between the dates of Oct 24-Oct29th each year. That is enough data for me to relax until the end of October.
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Last edited by troutdoorsman; 08-20-2017 at 08:36 PM.
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post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-21-2017, 11:31 AM
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Good post. Thanks for the taking the time to put it up. We're all doing these multiple trip things now but darn they take a lot of time! The Mink video was cool (on Insta). Nice big trout too. Our bigger waters are not yet down to the point of being able to get back on them and the Lehigh is still averaging about 70 degrees so it's off line for a good month yet but I look forward to that too.


Have you ever thought about heading back to those Rohdy tunnel streams in the winter and pruning them back a little in areas? I've considered that although I am sure I will be 'disavowed' for that again lol. I just always find it such a shame that certain placed can't even be fished. One of my top 3 streams in the state, the upper half is completely unfishable cause of it. Like 2 miles of stream. Every year I say I'm going in with pruners and a saw and just opening things up a little so I can at least navigate. 98% of all other fisherman wouldn't be able to fish it still but we can work in tighter places than most. I never do it cause I get tied up in other things but I'd like to. I figure a prune with last a good couple of years easy.


I hear you on the fall fishing. I say it ever year too but then I go out in October after a 40 degree night and see how crappy the trout fishing is compared to the summer after a 60 degree night and realize that sitting in a tree is actually a much more worth while affair than unproductive trout fishing. Did it for years. Now winter, Spring, Summer, Fall, I wont even bother unless the night temp is above 50 or unless I can fish later in the morning when stream temps have warmed up a little.
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post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-21-2017, 03:57 PM
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I think I can name each of those streams/rivers. LOL

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post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-21-2017, 05:24 PM Thread Starter
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send me a PM just for fun Fleroo and give me your best guesses on the streams!

Trout- I write these multi day posts over a few days. I just save a word document and keep adding to it. I also have thought about trimming, but I'm always fooling around with other critters in the winter to go back.
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post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-21-2017, 06:50 PM
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That uniquely-colored pink rainbow is quite pretty. When I was a kid I recall my dad taking me and my three brothers to a little native brookie stream in NC PA. The brookies there were crimson -- like a rainbow -- not orange. Someday I want to go back there and photograph a few of them. The only problem is that the stream is a little out of the way from my normal travels. I'd only go there on the way home since it is not a first-choice-type stream. Someday...

I really like the photo of the 19" stocked brown from the "big river."

I was surprised when you said that mink spend most of their time hunting on land. I would have thought just the opposite. What makes you say that? Isn't the bulk of their diet comprised of fish and crayfish, and on one steam I fish, clams? What are they eating that they find on land? I've seen them hunting mostly in the water. I thought that was why they stayed near streams. I've never seen one that wasn't near water. Obviously I've often seen them searching and moving along the banks of streams, but I always thought that was just how they got to the next spot to slip into the water. In my teenage years I caught four mink while muskrat trapping and all four were in conibear traps. By the way, I'm not trying to start an argument. I'm just curious why you would think they hunt mostly on land.

Feel free to PM me with the names of these little streams. I already know the name of the big one.

I can be contacted at [email protected].
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post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-21-2017, 08:04 PM
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Another great post! You catch more wild rainbows than anybody I know. I enjoyed the pictures too.
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post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-21-2017, 08:13 PM Thread Starter
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A quote from the best mink trapper I know "Mink are land animals that frequent the water." My best year I caught 53 mink. Without looking back at my records, I'd guess that at least 35 of them were caught on the dry bank. They take to the water more and more as the temperature drops and snow accumulates. There is less food available on land for them then. If you think about it, 32 degree water feels a lot warmer than single digit air temps if you are a mink. Most all mink I skin are covered in ticks, which proves how much time they spend on land, especially the males. Once you know what to look for, its easy to find the faint mink trails along every stream especially when vegetation dies back. At the world's foremost educational event for mink trappers, "Minktoberfest" held in Punxsutawney,PA we spend time observing mink hunting in different habitats. The host, Don Powell has two pet mink that he lets run around. Mink mostly enter the water in deep, slow pools where they have the best chance of catching prey. Many many times the mink will approach a deep hole, walk out onto a protruding rock or log, and stick their heads into the water and observe the pool. I've also spent way too much time following mink tracks along a stream, with them keeping mostly on the bank. I've caught many a mink with a mouse or bird in its mouth too. My neighbor caught a mink with a cat in its mouth two years ago. It carried the cat through a 160 sized conibear.

To your point, or course mink spend a lot of time in the water all year long, but as far as the best mink trapping minds in the country know, they spend more time on land until they are forced into the water by cold temps or snow.

Bridge culverts are super effective mink trapping locations because if they are traveling the bank, they are forced into the water and hug the edge of the bridge wall so they can exit as soon as possible. Tom Miranda, in his trapping movies from the 80s calls these "first in and first out spots". They are also high percentage spots for mink. If your appetite for mink knowledge still isn't satiated, join minktrapping.com and follow the discussion forum we have there!
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post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-22-2017, 08:55 AM
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Will do. I think I can even name the "vista" area you were at. LOL

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post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-22-2017, 09:16 AM
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Terrific post and pictures, thank you for sharing!!! :-)

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post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 08-22-2017, 11:17 AM
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Interesting Mink facts for sure. The culvert thing makes a ton of sense.
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