Hardening a Frizzen - The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community
 
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post #1 of 7 (permalink) Old 01-05-2015, 12:55 PM Thread Starter
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Hardening a Frizzen

Any tips on re-hardening a frizzen.

I've seen a video of a guy wrapping it in leather and stuffing it in a tin can. Crimp can closed and put in hot coals for an hour then quench in cold water. I've also heard about Cherry Red.

Any of you guys ever try it? If so how did you do it?

Thanks for any info.

I see said the Blind Carpenter to his Deaf Helper as he picked up his Hammer and Saw!
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post #2 of 7 (permalink) Old 01-05-2015, 01:30 PM
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Re: Hardening a Frizzen

I've seen it done with Kasenit and an acetylene torch by a person experienced with these. It turned out well.

Rich Deerhunter
Cochranville, PA
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post #3 of 7 (permalink) Old 01-05-2015, 02:10 PM
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Re: Hardening a Frizzen

Conditioning the Frizzen.

The condition of the frizzen is very important to how many sparks are produced with a sharp flint. If the frizzen looks like a "washboard", breaks up the edge of your flint, or doesn't throw many sparks, it is time to clean up the face of the frizzen and reharden it. The procedure that I use is very easy. I have heat treated over a hundred frizzens with this method. The items you need are: One wire clothes hanger; "Kasenit" surface hardening compound; Two quarts cheap 30-weight motor oil; one quart cheap automatic transmission fluid; and two propane torches (one will not generate enough heat).
Flinlock frizzen ground and ready to be heat treated.

I suggest that you do this outside or in a well ventilated area. Mix the oils together in a large coffee can or similar metal container equipped with a lid for storage. Three quarts of oil will stay cool longer and cool the metal best. CAUTION: Do not use water, because it can cause fractures in the metal by cooling too quickly. Remove the frizzen spring and the frizzen from the lock. Smooth the face of the frizzen on a six-inch coarse grinding wheel. Go slow and grind off only enough metal to remove any "wash board" and gouges. Grind vertically, not across the frizzen. Don't worry about getting the frizzen hot, you're going to heat treat it anyway.

Next, cut a section of wire from the clothes hanger, about eight to ten inches long. Run the wire through the screw hole in the frizzen and wrap the wire tightly so the frizzen doesn't flop around. Pour about a cup of "Kasenit" into a shallow metal can. A tuna can works well. Clamp one of the torches in a vise and light both torches. Heat the frizzen until it is bright red throughout. It must be entirely heated to a uniform color. Smother the heated frizzen in the "Kasenit" until it is well coated. The "Kasenit" will melt and adhere to the metal. Immediately reheat again to a bright red color and cook it for about three minutes. Be sure the entire frizzen is a uniform bright red color and completely coated. After cooking, quickly quench the heated frizzen in the oil mixture and swirl it around to assure fast cooling. Leave the frizzen in the oil until it is cool enough to handle. Wipe the excess oil from the frizzen and repeat the procedure for a second time. I do the above procedure twice to assure a good deep hardening.

After the frizzen is cooled enough to handle, clean it with acetone, alcohol, or any degreasing agent. Remove it from the wire and polish the face of the frizzen with 400 grit paper or emery cloth. Be careful, and don't drop the frizzen on a hard surface because it is brittle like glass and can break at this point. Affix the frizzen back onto the wire and light one torch. With a low flame starting at the pivot point and pan lid, slowly and carefully heat the frizzen. This is called drawing the temper back. Be sure that the color changes uniformly. It will happen very fast. When it reaches a soft yellow/brown (STRAW) color, quickly quench it in the oil and swirl around to assure uniform cooling. Leave in the oil until completely cool. The ideal colors are between straw and bronze. If you don't hit the straw color, but maybe blue, don't despair. Try it for sparking; it will probably work well anyway.

Remove the frizzen from the oil and clean with a degreasing agent. Put a drop of oil in the screw hole and install the frizzen and frizzen spring back onto the lock. Test it using a new sharp flint. It may take several attempts before you start getting uniform sparking. After you start getting sparks, check to see if there are any tiny metal shavings in the pan. If there are, you have done it right.

This is from Charlie Maggard take from here:http://www.muzzleblasts.com/archives.../mbo41-3.shtml
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post #4 of 7 (permalink) Old 01-05-2015, 02:16 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Hardening a Frizzen

Thanks for all the info!

I see said the Blind Carpenter to his Deaf Helper as he picked up his Hammer and Saw!
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post #5 of 7 (permalink) Old 01-05-2015, 11:45 PM
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Re: Hardening a Frizzen

Cherry red is the replacement for kastenite as its no longer being made....

Anybody can shoot deer on the farm ground....You earn it in the mountains.......
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post #6 of 7 (permalink) Old 01-07-2015, 01:20 AM
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Re: Hardening a Frizzen

I messed around with a few ways to re-harden a frizzen last year. I tried the wrap in leather and put in a charcoal fire, didn't seem to do much. I re-soled the face with hardened steel which did seem to work. Didn't want to spend the money to buy a whole thing of cherry red. But my best results were buying a Lyman frizzen and working it to fit my T/C Renegade.

Work is for people who don't hunt!!
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post #7 of 7 (permalink) Old 01-07-2015, 07:53 PM
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Re: Hardening a Frizzen

iam not far from you and i have kasenite you are welcome to have some

hate hang fires
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