Fertilizer? - The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community
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post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-21-2020, 10:26 AM Thread Starter
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Fertilizer?

I just received my soil test results that I had done thru PennState Extension and I am trying to decipher the report & what to do.

I have two established clover plots that were planted 3 years ago and the PH came back 6.9 & 6.6 respectfully so no lime would be required.

However, the chart reflects that the phosphorus, potassium & magnesium are all in the "Above Optimum" range on both plots. The report also shows to apply fertilizer after the first cut but there is no recommendation on what fertilizer to use. In the past I just took it upon myself & used clover topper (3-10-10) from Agway every spring & fall.

What fertilizer if any should I use. Thanks Joe

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post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-21-2020, 10:34 AM
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Looks like you wouldn't want that. Why put more phosphorus and potassium on when it says above optimum?

I would guess you'd want something like (10-0-0) just nitrogen.

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post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-21-2020, 10:36 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joe8768 View Post
I just received my soil test results that I had done thru PennState Extension and I am trying to decipher the report & what to do.

I have two established clover plots that were planted 3 years ago and the PH came back 6.9 & 6.6 respectfully so no lime would be required.

However, the chart reflects that the phosphorus, potassium & magnesium are all in the "Above Optimum" range on both plots. The report also shows to apply fertilizer after the first cut but there is no recommendation on what fertilizer to use. In the past I just took it upon myself & used clover topper (3-10-10) from Agway every spring & fall.

What fertilizer if any should I use. Thanks Joe

I would think you need to increase your nitrogen, the first number and lower the second two numbers based off of having high phosphorus and potassium.
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post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-21-2020, 10:44 AM
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If the OP were to apply nitrogen, he is only helping the weeds. Clover fixes its own Nitrogen.

With a pH like that and P and K at above optimum, I would not do anything but keep it mowed.
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post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-21-2020, 03:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OAWC View Post
If the OP were to apply nitrogen, he is only helping the weeds. Clover fixes its own Nitrogen.
With a pH like that and P and K at above optimum, I would not do anything but keep it mowed.
It sounds like you can probably skip it this year. (More beer money!) I think that guidance is in the report, whether or not you need fertilizer. OAWC is right. No NITROGEN! I'd look for 0-20-20 or even 10-20-20. (I found 10-20-20 cheaper than 0-20-20) The quote below looks like it really wants K.

Per PSU - https://extension.psu.edu/white-clover
Clover stands should be fertilized annually according to soil test recommendations. In the absence of a soil test and assuming a medium-fertility soil, apply 0-60-145 lb per acre.

From Craig Harper's book "A Guide to Successful Wildlife Food Plots"
Prior to planting either a cool or warm-season plot, soil pH should be amended by incorporating 2 tons of lime per acre approximately 6 inches into the soil. To establish clovers, 0–30 pounds of N, 90 pounds of phosphate, and 90 pounds of potash per acre are recommended. This could be accomplished with approximately four bags of 0-46-0 and three bags of 0-0-60 per acre. When establishing plots, these fertilizers should be incorporated 4–6 inches by disking or tilling. N (no more than one bag of 34-0-0 per acre) should be incorporated prior to planting or top-dressed after germination and initial growth. If you are maintaining a perennial plot of clovers, the P and K recommendations can be lowered by 30 pounds each. That is because a greater amount of P and K is needed during establishment for initial root development. N fertilization is typically not needed when establishing legumes if the seed have been properly inoculated. If the seed were not inoculated, N fertilizer should be applied.

Last edited by RGrizzzz; 04-21-2020 at 03:27 PM.
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post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-21-2020, 09:59 PM
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good example here of why soil sampling is important saved you money bc no fertilizer is needed
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post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-24-2020, 08:34 PM
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if just nitrogen is needed, try just plain Urea fertilizer { 46-0-0}. do not broadcast heavy, go light on it. It will burn your clover plants if put on to heavy. good luck.
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post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-24-2020, 09:11 PM Thread Starter
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No nitrogen is needed with an established clover plot. If used it’s conducive with growing weeds

I got this below clip from another site

For example, you might not need to put nitrogen on some plants. Clover “fixes” nitrogen in the soil. That is, it actually converts nitrogen from the air and puts it into the ground. Spreading additional nitrogen likely won’t have any benefit to the clover, but it will feed unwanted grasses in your food plot, creating more competition for other nutrients, moisture and root space. That’s why it’s a good idea to fertilize clover with a mix higher in phosphorous, which promotes root growth, and lower in nitrogen. Clover and other legumes like beans and alfalfa also benefit from higher doses of potassium, which protects against heat and cold stress and helps protect against diseases. However, grasses like corn, wheat and rye require lots of nitrogen, so a fertilizer with a high first number and lower second and third numbers (such as 28-4-8) are best for annual grasses.

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Last edited by joe8768; 04-24-2020 at 09:30 PM.
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