Is a cut corn field bait? - Page 2 - The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community
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post #11 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-03-2019, 04:24 PM
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Our Pheasants Forever Chapter plants about 50 acres of row crops (corn/soybean, sorghum and sunflower) on the pheasant stocking areas of a local game lands every year. There is no intentions of harvesting it as it is strictly habitat.

We wait until after the end of February (the end of pheasant season) then as soon as the weather (snow cover and ground conditions) allow we go in and brush hog it. We do that so it is ready to plant again come spring.

We try to have it all cut before the middle of March so it has been down for more than 30 days prior to the spring gobbler season. Even though there is an exception for habitat management we still do our best to stay within the same parameters as if it wasn't being done as a management practice.

As Woods Walker has suggested you should get the opinion of the local Game Warden. The answer could be dependent on any number of a number of variables including the timing and reason for the cutting.

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post #12 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-03-2019, 04:39 PM
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As you say they picked what they could get they did not intentionally leave entire field with the purpose of brush hogging it and leaving it lay the next year. We had a few acres they were on pickle ball last year drive by those fields now you’ll find that they have been brush hog raked and bailed for bedding.
I am a farmer and I have seen some large farming operations do this. They make a crop insurance claim, and there were a lot of those last year and basically the field is let go. In the spring it is mowed down, tilled and then replanted. So it is not an uncommon farming practice when faced with difficult planting, growing and harvesting seasons.
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post #13 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-03-2019, 04:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Cscott1 View Post
As you say they picked what they could get they did not intentionally leave entire field with the purpose of brush hogging it and leaving it lay the next year. We had a few acres they were on pickle ball last year drive by those fields now you’ll find that they have been brush hog raked and bailed for bedding.
I am a farmer and I have seen some large farming operations do this. They make a crop insurance claim, and there were a lot of those last year and basically the field is let go. In the spring it is mowed down, tilled and then replanted. So it is not an uncommon farming practice when faced with difficult planting, growing and harvesting seasons.
it is not a viable corn field then. So it is not a farming practice it is what is done when you farming practice goes wrong. Leaving a viable corn field stand till spring then mowing not farming it is baiting.
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post #14 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-03-2019, 04:57 PM
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it is not a viable corn field then. So it is not a farming practice it is what is done when you farming practice goes wrong. Leaving a viable corn field stand till spring then mowing not farming it is baiting.

Did you not see the weather last year in PA and MD? Fields that typically produce 200 bushel per acre produce less than 50 last year. I saw many fields that farmers planted, the seed only came up 30% and the farmer was faced with two options, replant or take the crop insurance claim. A realistic farmer would not go mud in their equipment leaving massive ruts to deal with for future years. We still have fields that we will not go into because they are too wet.
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post #15 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-03-2019, 05:04 PM
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it is not a viable corn field then. So it is not a farming practice it is what is done when you farming practice goes wrong. Leaving a viable corn field stand till spring then mowing not farming it is baiting.

Did you not see the weather last year in PA and MD? Fields that typically produce 200 bushel per acre produce less than 50 last year. I saw many fields that farmers planted, the seed only came up 30% and the farmer was faced with two options, replant or take the crop insurance claim. A realistic farmer would not go mud in their equipment leaving massive ruts to deal with for future years. We still have fields that we will not go into because they are too wet.
30% yield is not a viable corn field. By all indications the field in the op had no issues and was left standing. That is not an agricultural practice. Farmers don’t waste good corn.
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post #16 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-03-2019, 05:29 PM
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This is why baiting on private land should be legal. That way hunters and landowners can decide if they want to use bait while hunting. Baiting laws are ambiguous at best. When retired WCO's cant give you a answer, suggest that you should get an "opinion" from the local WCO, that should tell you something.

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post #17 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-03-2019, 06:16 PM
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Yeah, that should tell you that policy and interpretations may have changed since WCOs who have been retired for 12 years or more or less. Hunting over that brush hogged field would be legal not for dove hunting but probably not for turkey.

When you are up to your butt in alligators, it is hard to remember your intent was to drain the swamp. Stay focused!
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post #18 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-03-2019, 06:43 PM
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The first year we planted corn as a food plot we put out about 2 acres of corn and the deer did not respond to it the first year as they did seem not to know what it was, so in late Feb. and March we hand picked what we thought was the most of the corn. Then in April one of the guys brush hogged it and there was a lot of corn on the ground the turkeys flocked in and spent most of the day feeding, strutting, coming and going.

It stayed that way for about a week until we could get it plowed under which we were doing anyway to plant clover for the next year. We did not allow any one to hunt it until the 30 days passed. I drove past the field often, and did not see any turkeys after the first week or ten days. I don't know of any one hunting there and I am not aware of anyone taking a gobbler there that spring.

However, I can tell you the draw and holding of large numbers of turkeys while the bush hogged corn was on the ground was massive and to me an unfair advantage to set up on.

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post #19 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-03-2019, 07:23 PM
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the one farm i hunt, they harvest the corn and brush hog the field after the harvest. someone said they were baiting as they do it before deer season. Game Warden checked and found out they have been doing it that way for over 40 years.


that falls under
Quote:
"normal or accepted farming or habitat management practice",

no doubt it was the anti hunting neighbors who moved in and built a huge house just down the road from a working dairy farm. they also used to complain when the wind blew their way after manure was spread in the field directly across from their house

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post #20 of 20 (permalink) Old 04-03-2019, 08:40 PM
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From the regs book: "This section
does not pertain to hunting near areas where accepted farming or
habitat-management practices are taking place (example: hunting
near food plots on game lands is legal)."

Would your situation not fall under "habitat-management practices"?
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