beginner flintlock? - The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community
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post #1 of 28 (permalink) Old 03-30-2017, 08:18 PM Thread Starter
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beginner flintlock?

I am looking to get my first flintlock rifle. I have been hunting for years but have not used a flintlock for deer yet. At this time I'm not looking to spent a lot of money until I see if I will like it and will upgrade in the future. What would you guys recommend? A local gun shop has a used CVA Plainsman 50cal. in nice shape for under $200, do you think this would fit what I am looking for?


Thank for your input
Ed
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post #2 of 28 (permalink) Old 03-30-2017, 08:29 PM
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My first one was a CVA 30 some years ago. Bought a Lyman DeerStalker a few years ago and love it too. You have a few months to look for one before you need to start practicing with it. Keep us posted on your decision.
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post #3 of 28 (permalink) Old 03-30-2017, 08:39 PM
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If I had do it over again I would look for something with a set trigger
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post #4 of 28 (permalink) Old 03-30-2017, 09:19 PM
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Get the best one you can afford to start. Some of the cheaper ones do not have fast locks and you will then see why they call them "flinch locks" You should be able to find a decent Thompson Center or Lyman for 350 or less. If you don't like it you can sell it and not lose money, although you will probably get hooked. Good luck
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post #5 of 28 (permalink) Old 03-30-2017, 09:49 PM
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A key ingredient is getting in touch with someone who knows their way around a muzzle loader. Sure you can get onto this truly wonderful sport all on your own but there are a lot of short-cuts and knowledge that can be passed on by an experienced shooter that you will never pick up on your own - no matter how expensive your rifle and accouterments are.
However, and as some folks have already mentioned, buy the best flinter you can afford and be prepared for a steep learning curve. If you buy cheap gear then your chances of having a bad start leading to disappointment and frustration are very high. Since you are in this general area (SE PA) I recommend that you pay a visit to Dixon's Muzzleloading Shop in Kempton. Have a list of questions and if you have to - wait in line to speak to Greg Dixon.
Experiment (within reason), read, listen and ask questions. Above all don't take chances and make sure the gun is unloaded. I have seen too many new ML shooters ram home a charge and then decide to end the days shooting without pulling the load or firing the rifle. Just saying.

Good night Chesty, wherever you are......
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post #6 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-25-2017, 03:23 PM
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You can't do better than a trip to Dixon's. They usually have some used ones in the shop too.
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post #7 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-25-2017, 06:41 PM
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I would go to Dixons !

Dixons Muzzle Loading — Muzzle Loading Shop - Kempton, PA


Here is more info on getting started.

M/L Basics

The answers to all of life's questions are found in the Bible!
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post #8 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-25-2017, 07:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jimsdad View Post
I have seen too many new ML shooters ram home a charge and then decide to end the days shooting without pulling the load or firing the rifle. Just saying.

I've been shooting muzzleloaders for over 20 years and I sometimes leave a charge in my gun for the entire season. There is nothing wrong with the practice, so long as you take care to insure the flash pan is empty and the flash hole is plugged. Yes, a completely unloaded gun is surely the safest, but its up to the individual. If one feels as though he needs to fire the gun or pull the ball to be completely safe, then so be it. However others may feel that they are competent enough to leave the gun charged and still be able to remain safe with it. I've never had any issues leaving a charge in my guns.
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post #9 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-25-2017, 07:21 PM
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I've been shooting muzzleloaders for over 20 years and I sometimes leave a charge in my gun for the entire season. There is nothing wrong with the practice, so long as you take care to insure the flash pan is empty and the flash hole is plugged. Yes, a completely unloaded gun is surely the safest, but its up to the individual. If one feels as though he needs to fire the gun or pull the ball to be completely safe, then so be it. However others may feel that they are competent enough to leave the gun charged and still be able to remain safe with it. I've never had any issues leaving a charge in my guns.
Well your 20 years shooting a ML is about 20 years short of mine. And then you have never had the experience of checking out a uesd ML in a gun store and finding a load in the barrel. Just saying.
And no, there is nothing wrong with leaving a load in the barrel as long as you remove it - sooner or later.

So be it.

Good night Chesty, wherever you are......
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post #10 of 28 (permalink) Old 04-26-2017, 12:40 PM
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Well your 20 years shooting a ML is about 20 years short of mine. And then you have never had the experience of checking out a uesd ML in a gun store and finding a load in the barrel. Just saying.
And no, there is nothing wrong with leaving a load in the barrel as long as you remove it - sooner or later.

So be it.
True, however your first comment was not directed at a gun store arm that was left loaded, but to me implied that a person should never leave a charge in their weapon, because its unsafe to do so. Yes, I agree that at some point that load needs to be removed, whether by pulling the ball and dumping the powder, or by firing.
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