Tips for wing shooting and pointing a shotgun? - The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community
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post #1 of 56 (permalink) Old 01-14-2014, 12:55 PM Thread Starter
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Tips for wing shooting and pointing a shotgun?

I grew up squirrel hunting with small caliber rifles. I moved into shooting high powered rifles for deer and such as well. If I was using a shotgun it was for squirrels on the ground, bunnies, and just this past year got into turkey hunting. I am also a die hard bow hunter as well. With all of these sports you are required to aim at a specific spot to make you kill.

I just got into wing shooting this year, and was looking for any advice, tips, tricks, and good references to get better at wing shooting.

I have been reading through some information so far and came up with a few notes.

1) you shouldn't aim a shotgun, you should point it
2) the mount is very critical on effective wing shooting.

I have been working with the mount a bit, and trying to find some drills to break my need to feel like I have to aim.

I have read that your eyes and arms are what you should use to shoot, not the bead. I have been mounting the gun and picking out objects on the wall, and pointing at them. I am not looking at the bead when I do this. I mounting and imagine a triangle of my arms and eyes and let my eyes direct the barrel. I have my face where i typically would. Once I decide I should be on target, I look at the bead and see how close I am. I am surprised at how close you can really get without actually aiming. Is this a good drill? What can I do to break the habit of "must aim at the bead?"

I really want to improve my wing shooting, and want to start with a good foundation before taking the next steps of shooting trap and such. I am not a terrible shot, but I would like to be more consistent, and know what I am doing, and why I am doing it.

I plan on joining a trap league this spring and continue into the fall.

Any tips, breakdowns, references, or advice would be appreciated.

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post #2 of 56 (permalink) Old 01-14-2014, 01:01 PM
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Re: Tips for wing shooting and pointing?

Gil Ash for NSSF has some very good instructional videos. check them out. He has a bunch. Here's 2.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SRrXC_XwUQw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U1O8QrxrFJk

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post #3 of 56 (permalink) Old 01-14-2014, 01:03 PM
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Re: Tips for wing shooting and pointing?

Shoot where they're going, not where they've been. It also helps to learn to shoot with both eyes open if you don't already.

I don't have ducks. I don't have rows. I have squirrels. And they're drunk.
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post #4 of 56 (permalink) Old 01-14-2014, 01:04 PM
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Re: Tips for wing shooting and pointing a shotgun?

I'm in the same boat with just about the same background.
The hardest part for me is keeping both eyes open and not aiming down barrel looking for the bead.

I've read that if you stop to aim with bead, you're already to late and behind the bird.
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post #5 of 56 (permalink) Old 01-14-2014, 01:04 PM
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Re: Tips for wing shooting and pointing?

here's some from his OSP site.

http://www.ospknowledgevault.com/osp-home-free-videos

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post #6 of 56 (permalink) Old 01-14-2014, 01:09 PM
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Re: Tips for wing shooting and pointing?

For crossing or quartering shots, try to remember the four "B's". Butt, Body, Beak, BANG. The most important thing to do is to keep the gun swinging through the bird. As lost said, if you try to aim, you're already behind the bird.

I don't have ducks. I don't have rows. I have squirrels. And they're drunk.
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post #7 of 56 (permalink) Old 01-14-2014, 01:38 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Tips for wing shooting and pointing?

That is my problem with this. I know I am stopping and trying to aim. I need to think of it as throwing a football to someone. on a crossing pattern. You don't at them, you throw where they are going to be.


Do you guys look at your bead when a grouse flushes, or are you used to the mount, and used to anchoring your head at a point on the gun, and letting your eyes, and arms aim for you?

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post #8 of 56 (permalink) Old 01-14-2014, 01:47 PM
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Re: Tips for wing shooting and pointing?

look at the birds eye keep looking at them the whole time and if you miss just make sure you miss by shooting in front of the bird...

wmu 3A
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post #9 of 56 (permalink) Old 01-14-2014, 02:09 PM
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Re: Tips for wing shooting and pointing a shotgun?

My advice would be to forget the trap league and start shooting low gun skeet regularly if you're serious about becoming a better field shot.
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post #10 of 56 (permalink) Old 01-14-2014, 02:21 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Tips for wing shooting and pointing a shotgun?

HERE IS AN EXCERPT FROM THAT OLDER ARTICLE I PUT UP THE OTHER DAY:

Grouse are hard to hit because they almost always surprise you, because they are in range for only a couple of seconds, and because a shotgun doesn't point as naturally as your finger. You can't do much about the first two problems, so to improve your grouse shooting, you have to make the shotgun an extension of your pointing instinct. Some practical suggestions:

•Focus: While hunting, keep your eyes focused on the middle distance. When a bird gets up, watch it, not the gun. Use your unfocused, almost subliminal view of the barrel as a pointing aid while you devote 98 percent of your attention to the bird.

•Gently, gently: Bring the gun to your face, not your face to the gun. When you mount your shotgun to shoot, push it slightly forward, track the moving target with the muzzle, and then bring the stock gently up to your face and shoulder just before you shoot.

•Get fit: A shotgun "fits" fairly well when you bring it to your shoulder and find that the eye on that side is above the centerline of the gun, with the barrel's top rib appearing level and on the same plane as the eye. The gun will then shoot where you look. <span style="color: #FFFF33">If the rib seems to be slanting uphill, the top of the stock is lifting your shooting eye too high and the gun will shoot high.</span> If the stock is too low, you won't see the rib at all and your gun will shoot low. It's OK if a grouse gun shoots a little high, but a low-shooting gun is a disaster. A low stock can be built up with stick-on rubber pads.

<span style="color: #FFFF33"> I can see the rib on my O/U would I be wise to try and pattern this by trying to shoot instinctively/pointing. What can be done so I am not seeing the rib of the gun. It appears to have a higher rib.</span>

•Be ready: In the field, carry your gun with its muzzle at eye level and hold the stock against your right rib cage with your right forearm (or vice-versa for left-handers). The barrels should be angled out about 45 degrees from the front of your body, and at a 45 degree upward angle.

•Be binocular: If possible, learn to shoot with both eyes open. To find out if you can be a "two-eyed" shooter, make a half-inch circle with your thumb and forefinger. With both eyes open, concentrate on a small object about 20 yards away. Keeping both eyes open, extend your arm to its full length and center the object in the circle. Now move your hand slowly back to your face, keeping both eyes open and the object centered in the circle. The eye that the circle naturally comes to is your dominant eye, the one your brain uses to point at things. If your dominant eye is on the same side as your shooting shoulder, you're in luck. Two-eyed shooting should be fairly easy for you. But if you shoot from the right shoulder and have a left dominant eye, you'll have to learn to close your left eye as you mount the gun, letting your right eye do all the work – and vice-versa for left-handers.

•Follow the leader: If you are right-handed, your left hand grips the forestock of the gun, and is called the "leading hand." When a grouse flushes, you'll hear it before you see it. Your body will instinctively turn toward the sound and, when you see the bird, your leading hand will point the gun near it, usually just behind it. As you move the gun to the bird, the stock will come up to your shoulder almost automatically.

•Swing through: A moving target must be shot with a moving gun. Once you've learned to mount the gun smoothly, instinct will bring it up right behind the bird. Swing through the bird, fire when the gun passes it, and keep swinging along the bird's projected line of flight. Keep your cheek firmly on the stock until well after the shot is fired.

<span style="color: #FFFF00">I think this will be the biggest barrier for me. I could see me wanting to point in front of the bird and shoot and hope he flys into it.</span>

This "swing-through" method gets the gun moving faster than the bird. Your eyes and hearing find the bird in the air, your instinct points the gun just behind it, and your conscious mind sweeps the gun through the bird to fire at the place where it is going to be a fraction of a second later. Don't worry about how far you have to "lead" the bird. Just remember this sequence: behind–beak–bang.

<span style="color: #FFFF00">Looks like it is more about the mechanics of allowing your left arm to go to the bird, while mounting, and your eyes meeting with your arms, swing through and fire. To be honest, some of the birds I have missed, I had about 1500 thoughts going through my mid at the same time and whiff every time. Seems you are better off just picking up the gun and trusting your instincts.</span>

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