Today's Hardy Stockie Pheasant - The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community
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post #1 of 37 (permalink) Old 12-30-2013, 02:57 AM Thread Starter
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Today's Hardy Stockie Pheasant

I know one or two guys who will answer right away, but my question is this:
With the right habitat, farming practices, etc., do you think these birds the PGC is releasing have a reasonable fighting chance to survive and reproduce ?
I mean, they are strong flyers to say the least, and some of these roosters we're taking look like small turkeys.
The whole practice of raising them with minimal human contact is evident in their wariness and similarity to wild birds.
The haters can stay home on this one....

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post #2 of 37 (permalink) Old 12-30-2013, 03:20 AM
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Re: Today's Hardy Stockie Pheasant

Out of the loop on this....haven't been into pheasant hunting in a few years..
Have they gone to a different bird???


We noticed the birds on the coop farms look and act much more like a wild bird...and seem to survive much longer than usual....
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post #3 of 37 (permalink) Old 12-30-2013, 03:43 AM
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Re: Today's Hardy Stockie Pheasant

I wish I could say they would but history says they won't. To survive in the wild, a prey species needs to be top notch in every way. A game farm bird just has too much against them. I believe it's a combination of genetic and behavioral issues that make it too difficult to survive in large numbers. A few will survive with good cover.

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post #4 of 37 (permalink) Old 12-30-2013, 09:56 AM
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Re: Today's Hardy Stockie Pheasant

No. some will survive but these birds are made to be shot. they are put and take. they trap and transfer wild ones to try and get a population.
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post #5 of 37 (permalink) Old 12-30-2013, 10:21 AM
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Re: Today's Hardy Stockie Pheasant

No hate. Just observations...

From June through September I spent literally hundreds of hours on a stocked sgl in Erie county. I also drove several hundred miles through sgl during that time. I saw one rooster pheasant standing in a parking area.

I saw one along rt 98 in April on my way fishing.

I personally have never seen a hen with chicks in my life with thousands of hours in the woods and fields during that time of year. Not saying it doesn't happen, but I don't think its very common.

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post #6 of 37 (permalink) Old 12-30-2013, 12:40 PM
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Re: Today's Hardy Stockie Pheasant

I think it depends. Bwire on here was posting about a male rooster and some hens that hung around after last winter. At least one hen was bred and he even got pictures of the chicks. There is a lot of switch grass in that area. Which through the work that Lynn has been doing, switchgrass seems to help a lot.

So while it is rare for stocked birds to reproduce in any numbers, it could be possible with pheasant. Quail on the other hand, not so much.

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post #7 of 37 (permalink) Old 12-30-2013, 12:50 PM Thread Starter
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Re: Today's Hardy Stockie Pheasant

That's kind of what I was thinking. It's been established in the past that the PGC stockies cannot sustain given the current state of habitat, predator pressure, etc.
But what if they had a setting like the WPRA where the conditions are more optimum ? I have to believe some of these birds would find a way to make it.

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post #8 of 37 (permalink) Old 12-30-2013, 01:03 PM
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Re: Today's Hardy Stockie Pheasant

I'm quite certain the WPRA folks would be somewhat less than tickled to see pen raised stock put into the wild populace

wmu 3A
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post #9 of 37 (permalink) Old 12-30-2013, 01:09 PM
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Re: Today's Hardy Stockie Pheasant

Mixing wild populations with farm raised birds opens up another list of problems.

If an area was setup just for stocked birds, a few may reproduce and even less would survive to reproduce again, even with optimal cover. I sure would like to see something like that happen though.

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post #10 of 37 (permalink) Old 12-30-2013, 01:48 PM
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Re: Today's Hardy Stockie Pheasant

After the Game Commission acquired about 6000 acres of what was mostly reclaimed strip jobs about five or six years ago they planted some pretty large areas of warm season grass. Then in cooperation with the local Pheasants Forever Chapter did various habitat projects that included maintaining plots of row crops each summer. They also stocked the area with pheasant each year and pretty much every summer there would be a couple pheasant broods seen in the area.

Last year the Game Commission for the first time stocked some of the spent breeders (birds they held over winter and collected the eggs they laid to hatch for the next yearís stocking of pheasants) on those habitat areas. Last summer we saw several hens with broods but it certainly isnít enough to produce a sustainable hunting population of pheasants. In fact I doubt more than a couple survive to see their first hunting season let alone reproduce the next spring.

Dick Bodenhorn
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