WPRA program not looking good - The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community
 160Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 217 (permalink) Old 01-22-2018, 12:19 PM Thread Starter
Regular Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: NC
Posts: 2,103
Back To Top
WPRA program not looking good

Quote:
B. Amend 58 Pa. Code 141.28.
Commentary: The Somerset Wild Pheasant Recovery Area (WPRA) was established by
the Commission in 2009. From 2009-2011, 964 wild pheasants were
trapped and transferred to the WPRA and annual population and habitat
monitoring have continued through 2017. Population surveys show that
current wild pheasant numbers in this WPRA are very low, and much
lower than the initial population at the conclusion of releases. Staff have
concluded that due to habitat conditions, weather severity, or a
combination of these factors, a huntable wild pheasant population is not
achievable or sustainable on this WPRA and that in keeping with
guidelines established in the Pennsylvania Ring-necked Pheasant
Management Plan for unsuccessful WPRAs, the Somerset WPRA should
be dissolved and the area should be re-opened to either-sex pheasant
hunting and to the stocking of game farm pheasants.
Another WPRA gone
Dobsonknob is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 217 (permalink) Old 01-22-2018, 01:35 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: 2A-Wash. Co.
Posts: 16,089
Back To Top
Ya, they are slowly dissolving the program. But, quite a few folks dedicated a whole bunch of time into giving it a great try. They should all be commended for their efforts.
Bull, jimbridger, bigguy54 and 5 others like this.

2A-Wash. Co.
Fleroo is offline  
post #3 of 217 (permalink) Old 01-22-2018, 02:38 PM
Diehard Outdoorsman
 
FLDBRED's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: N.E. PA.
Posts: 3,922
Back To Top
The Somerset County WPRA was a mystery from the start . There is some great habitat in Somerset County, just NOT in the WPRA !
cmrosko and Dobsonknob like this.

It's breeding,training...and something unknown.
FLDBRED is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 217 (permalink) Old 01-23-2018, 04:49 PM
Regular Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,977
Back To Top
Back when this all started I said that it would not work, too many predators. Back then I was told how wrong I was, called a few names and told that these areas had habitat that would be right for pheasant. Many people put forth a great effort, but ignored the facts that its the predators killing. All this effort to provide habitat for the pheasants to hide from raptors failed. Not the habitat that kills the pheasants its the predators. I would be willing to bet that if you had controlled predator numbers, this would have worked. But then if predators were controlled you may not have lost pheasants in the first place. Maybe these same people who worked so hard with the pheasant habitat, could now focus on how to get regulations changed to address the problems, that the pheasant cover was unable to.
cmrosko, 4x4dad and Decktech like this.
bpottorff is offline  
post #5 of 217 (permalink) Old 01-23-2018, 06:57 PM
Regular Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Indiana,PA
Posts: 1,686
Back To Top
I agree. It was more of a...toss some wild birds out and hope they live...than a thought out scientific experiment. It was stupid to do all that work and not have some areas where predation was monitored and altered by man.
cmrosko, 4x4dad and Grouse&Hare like this.
indianahunter is offline  
post #6 of 217 (permalink) Old 01-23-2018, 07:54 PM
Sage
 
Woods walker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Posts: 25,383
Back To Top
Really? Where did you get your PHD in wildlife management and restoration? What is stupid is second guessing people and a program you know nothing about. Monday morning quarter backing by people who never played the game or who never could make the team!

When you are up to your butt in alligators, it is hard to remember your intent was to drain the swamp. Stay focused!
Woods walker is offline  
post #7 of 217 (permalink) Old 01-23-2018, 08:26 PM
Regular Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Posts: 1,753
Back To Top
I'm not familiar with this particular WPRA, but if the predators are the only problem then I expect that this entire area is totally devoid of small game. What were the predators eating prior to the pheasant stocking that allowed them to grow in such numbers? If a wild pheasant is easier prey than a squirrel, rabbit, groundhog, songbird...then yes habitat or something else is the problem.
jimbridger and bigguy54 like this.
Marcus99 is offline  
post #8 of 217 (permalink) Old 01-23-2018, 09:06 PM
Diehard Outdoorsman
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Carbon County, PA
Posts: 3,418
Back To Top
FYI, they're still doing the flushing surveys this February in the Central Susquehanna and Hegins-Gratz WPRAs. I'm hoping to get to one of them and maybe get the pup out a little as well. She'll at least come along for the ride, if only for her to get to show off what cute ball of mischief she is.

Hunt, Fish, Vote! I support AR and Sunday hunting. Life Member of NRA and TU.
RyanR is offline  
post #9 of 217 (permalink) Old 01-23-2018, 09:50 PM
Frequent Contributor
 
cmrosko's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: N.E Ohio
Posts: 662
Back To Top
From field mice to song birds to rabbits and pheasants the predators, especially raptors that migrate over hundreds of miles, have a large supply and variety of prey to harvest. When one species runs out there is almost always another available. Add that to the list of a high population of ground nest robbers and sparse winter food and cover it's not surprising to see why wild pheasants would have a tough time of making it.
bpottorff likes this.

Last edited by cmrosko; 01-23-2018 at 09:54 PM.
cmrosko is offline  
post #10 of 217 (permalink) Old 01-23-2018, 10:07 PM
Regular Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,977
Back To Top
Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcus99 View Post
I'm not familiar with this particular WPRA, but if the predators are the only problem then I expect that this entire area is totally devoid of small game. What were the predators eating prior to the pheasant stocking that allowed them to grow in such numbers? If a wild pheasant is easier prey than a squirrel, rabbit, groundhog, songbird...then yes habitat or something else is the problem.
Pheasants may be easier prey, as they are not native. Hawks also migrate when prey gets low in numbers, like in the fall of the year, when the prey numbers are not breeding.
bpottorff is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome