CWD in PA is not only affecting PA - The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-08-2018, 05:57 PM Thread Starter
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CWD in PA is not only affecting PA

South Carolinians planning out-of-state trips to hunt big game this fall should be aware of restrictions on importing deer and elk parts into the Palmetto State.

With big game seasons opening in many Western states, the S. C. Department of Natural Resources (SCDNR) would like to remind hunters traveling out-of-state not to import into South Carolina certain carcass parts from deer and elk harvested in areas where confirmed cases of chronic wasting disease (CWD) have occurred. U.S. States where CWD has been diagnosed include: Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming. CWD has also been found in the Canadian provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan.

To comply with state regulations, hunters traveling to states with confirmed cases of chronic wasting disease may only bring the following carcass parts into South Carolina:

Quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached
Meat that has been boned out
Hides with no heads attached
Clean skulls (no meat or tissue attached) or clean skull plates with antlers attached
Antlers (detached from the skull plate)
Clean upper canine teeth of elk, also called "buglers," "whistlers" or "ivories"
Finished taxidermy heads
Hunters may NOT import whole carcasses or parts of deer or elk that contain nervous system tissue such as the brain or spinal column. Hunters traveling out-of-state should also check with the wildlife agency in their destination state to determine its CWD status and follow any restrictions that state may have on the movement of carcasses.

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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-09-2018, 09:35 PM
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Very sad but how true its a trickle down affect for all sportsman. Several years a go the first out break I knew of close to me was Hampshire County W.Va. Living here in the panhandle of Md. many sportsman hunt Md., Pa., and W.Va. The first year in W.Va Md. butcher shops around me in western Md. would not accept any meat including de-boned meat from W.Va. Here in Md. a butcher shop for deer to be processed has to be approved and licensed thru our DNR. You have to give them your tag as long as they have it in there possession then when you pick it up they will return your tag.
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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-29-2018, 09:59 AM
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I guess I don't fully understand CWD. Are all of the precautions to prevent the spread of it, or is it dangerous to humans? EHD seems deadlier to the deer and we never seem to hear much about it. CWD has been in WI for years and they still appear to have great deer seasons. So what's going to happen if it spreads?
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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-29-2018, 11:56 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slippery Paw View Post
I guess I don't fully understand CWD. Are all of the precautions to prevent the spread of it, or is it dangerous to humans? EHD seems deadlier to the deer and we never seem to hear much about it. CWD has been in WI for years and they still appear to have great deer seasons. So what's going to happen if it spreads?
As I understand it EHD is a localized event spread by biting flies that kills relatively quickly. It kills lots of deer in a small area but doesn’t spread far. CWD on the other hand is much more concerning, the prions that cause CWD do not do so quickly which allows the infected deer to travel much farther with the disease all the while leaving additional prions behind. Since the prions can stay in the ground for decades it can pop back up in areas whe an infected deer had passed through years ago.

Imagine a buck contracts CWD before the rut, during that time he travels several miles looking for does. Along the way he hits several salt blocks and leaves the prions at each site, this in turn infects additional bucks who also travel miles looking for does. At this point it continues to spread and the deer won’t show any symptoms until the following year. By this time the prions have traveled miles from where the first infected deer is found all without anyone knowing how far it has gone.
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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-29-2018, 12:34 PM
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If that's the scenario it seems like a complete waste of time trying to contain it. Deer will always congregate at food sources and be around other deer. It will be impossible to stop. Is it transmitted through breeding? Perhaps that could eventually make fawns immune to it???? It must not kill all the deer in its wake though. It's been present in WI for years.
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-29-2018, 01:50 PM
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From what I understand, it takes over a year for an infected deer to have symptoms, but they can still spread the disease before they have symptoms. It can spread by direct contact between deer or contact with saliva, urine, feces, blood or antler velvet, and I think a contaminated area can stay contaminated for several years.

The scary part is that no one knows if it is dangerous to humans. There's a equivalent prion disease in humans that can take up to 40 years for infected people to have symptoms.

I totally agree that it may be impossible to stop, but I think part of the idea of isolating it is just to bide time while it's being studied. I do research with infectious bacteria, but I can't imagine working on this since no one knows if it will make you sick and standard decontamination methods don't work on it.

Since EHD is from a virus carried by biting midges and the infected deer die fairly quickly, the first hard frost will end a localized outbreak.
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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-29-2018, 02:19 PM
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It's been present in WI for years.
And out west for many decades. Western states still remain destination states for hunters.
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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 08-30-2018, 07:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slippery Paw View Post
If that's the scenario it seems like a complete waste of time trying to contain it. Deer will always congregate at food sources and be around other deer. It will be impossible to stop. Is it transmitted through breeding? Perhaps that could eventually make fawns immune to it???? It must not kill all the deer in its wake though. It's been present in WI for years.
I disagree with you. Taking every little precaution helps the broad picture. I cant think of an example but one case is I hate litter along the road, etc. I do not throw anything out my window but we still see litter along the road. I do my part and if many others did it might reduce is. Maybe not a good example but I think you see where im coming from.
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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-07-2018, 11:52 AM
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I hunt in Bradford county 50 to 60 yards from the New York border. I have killed
a lot of deer that have walked in to Pa. If I kill one it is illegal for me to bring it into
Pa. even tho the deer came from New York. When i hunt Chemung County in New York I
have killed deer that walked in to New York from Pa. now I can't bring it back into Pa.
legally I guess some one should tell them deer to stop crossing state lines.

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