"back in the day" - Page 3 - The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community
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post #21 of 33 (permalink) Old 02-06-2020, 06:32 AM
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I learned a lot from my father listening to the stories he told and didn't even realize he was teaching me something at the time.
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post #22 of 33 (permalink) Old 02-06-2020, 08:16 AM Thread Starter
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People are people no matter what the era..."back in the day" you had men with knickers and fancy overcoats and you had men crawling the mts hunting game and providing meat and fur. While some would remove their powdered wig and blow out the lamp at bedtime, others were looking for a log or some shelter to crawl into somewhere in the wilderness.


Not everyone was like the legends of old and the stuff that made story's......most were just like you and me I suppose.


When I was 12 yrs old I began trapping, I'd get up at 3:30 in the morning and go check my trapline (alone) before school. Back then I struggled to get a #2 coil spring set. I had to dispatch anything I caught without a gun because I wasn't old enough to carry one alone.


That summer I got a job at a farm about 2 1/2 miles away across the fields. I got up early every morning and walked to work, then walked home in the evening. I worked 10 hrs a day 6 days a week for 1.00 per hr. saved that 60.00 and thought I was really living big. Bought a Rem 760 pump 30-06 it belted the snot out of me but I learned to shoot it well, and eventually grew into it killed a bunch of deer with it.


At 14 yrs old I talked my parents into letting me get a coonhound. I also was still trapping and getting pretty good at it. Fri and sat nights I was allowed to hunt as long as I wanted. I could shinny up any tree I could get my arms and legs around. I remember one night I forgot a knife and had to carry the coon as I had no way of skinning. I was running a bluetick walker cross named patches and she was a holy terror on the local coon population. That night she treed 6 and I ended up a couple mile from home. I can still remember walking down a hard top road heading home, I had a hind leg of 3 coon in each hand and my arms felt like they were going to fall off. The sun was just coming up, I was dead bone tired, even the dog was tired and just trotted in front of me......sleep felt good that day.


that's a "back in the day' story that is actually very accurate.....no need to exaggerate on that one!
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post #23 of 33 (permalink) Old 02-06-2020, 09:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Strut10 View Post
I'm not "that old"...……………….. But "back in the day"...…….

I bought and hunted with the second ever bow that shot over 200 fps...…...the Browning X-Cellerator. The Bear Delta V was first.
I bought and hunted with the first bow to break 300 fps...…….....the Browning Ballistic Mirage.
I remember when you could hunt a few hours with the family Cocker spaniel and flush a dozen grouse.
I remember getting $32 for a coon hide, $50 for a gray fox and $70 for a red.
I remember when there were no turkeys or black bears within 10 miles of where I lived in 2D
I remember when there were no coyotes here.
I remember when there was no such thing as a "portable tree stand".
I remember when the shooting on the first bay of buck season sounded like a war.

Lol...my first brand new bow was the Browning ballistic mirage...I couldn’t get 300 out of it only 272 FPS. But that was smoking in those days. Hunted with a second hand Jennings forked lightning before that.
I often tell people I kept myself in money from fox hides when I was in school getting 40-60$ for fox. Would hunt all night with our town cop who was 6 years older then me. My Dad would let me go with him all the time. I’d catch up on sleep at school the next day.
Deer in my area were way more plentiful then than today. Would go spotting and see about 120 or so in a 5 mile trip. Same trip today your lucky to get 10-15.
Turkeys here were more plentiful then too. Flocks of 40-60-80 were quite common then.
No coyotes no bobcats no fishers then.
Deer season was a war!!! I could expect to hear the same sounding guns in the same areas every year.
My first climbing stand was the loggy bayou. I hugged the tree to climb and more then once tore my hands and chest up coming down unexpectedly! Would always build a platform up in a tree or stand on limbs before that.
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post #24 of 33 (permalink) Old 02-06-2020, 09:06 AM
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I remember, back in the day, when we thought we were high tech shooting laminated fiberglass limbs on our recurves and shooting fiberglass arrows instead of cedar. When I made a homemade tree stand, copied off the Baker, instead of standing on a limb, it almost felt illegal. I was always warm in my high tech wool cloths.
If I remember correctly one brand of those arrows were called Micro Flights, and if you were shooting them you were envied.
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post #25 of 33 (permalink) Old 02-06-2020, 10:17 AM
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Back in the day...I used to take my shotgun (and hunting clothes) on the school bus to put in a friends truck so we could go rabbit hunting after school. Pretty certain that wouldn't go over too well today. Plus, half the trucks in the school parking lot had guns in their window racks. No one ever thought anything of it and there was never a school shooting.
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post #26 of 33 (permalink) Old 02-06-2020, 10:41 AM
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Very interesting thread.
I have been doing a lot of reading on the French and Indian War (Seven Years War and actually the first World War) and one of the things that I find remarkable is the toughness of the men and women who lived then and participated in that struggle. Not only the physical endurance but the mental and moral strength on all sides to endure the hardships and unspeakable brutalities, of all participants, is astounding. And I have long been a reader of books and research relative to the US Civil War as well and find many similarities between the two time frames.
But the common thread that runs through both of them is the physical endurance of the soldiers and it's pretty clear that if it is understood that most of the men (especially in the 1700's) were miners, lumbermen, sailors, farmers and the like who were used to hardships and very strenuous work you can see that they were well suited for the stuff they went through.
I am 69 years old, 40 +/- pounds overweight and although I hit the gym a couple times a week I know for a fact that I could not hold up to what most men my age were expected to do in the 1700's and 1800's.
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Good night Chesty, wherever you are......
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post #27 of 33 (permalink) Old 02-06-2020, 10:59 AM
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I am 69 years old, 40 +/- pounds overweight and although I hit the gym a couple times a week I know for a fact that I could not hold up to what most men my age were expected to do in the 1700's and 1800's.

Well, the average life expectancy of a white male in 1787 was 38 years old. In 2000 it was mid 70's. Everything is relative.

GOBBLE THIS!!!
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post #28 of 33 (permalink) Old 02-06-2020, 11:47 AM
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Originally Posted by jimsdad View Post
Very interesting thread.
I have been doing a lot of reading on the French and Indian War (Seven Years War and actually the first World War) and one of the things that I find remarkable is the toughness of the men and women who lived then and participated in that struggle. Not only the physical endurance but the mental and moral strength on all sides to endure the hardships and unspeakable brutalities, of all participants, is astounding. And I have long been a reader of books and research relative to the US Civil War as well and find many similarities between the two time frames.
But the common thread that runs through both of them is the physical endurance of the soldiers and it's pretty clear that if it is understood that most of the men (especially in the 1700's) were miners, lumbermen, sailors, farmers and the like who were used to hardships and very strenuous work you can see that they were well suited for the stuff they went through.
I am 69 years old, 40 +/- pounds overweight and although I hit the gym a couple times a week I know for a fact that I could not hold up to what most men my age were expected to do in the 1700's and 1800's.
Very interesting read Jimsdad,
I believe mental toughness is really understated in a lot of what we deal with in our everyday lives.
From work issues, personal troubles and to being able to stay on stand for an entire day I believe it does not get enough attention.
I believe that our forefathers and their families were probably more mental tough then anything else and it exudes to one's longevity today.
I see all too often people (regardless of age) who will simply lay down instead of fighting ( in a mental sense of the word).
I like to use the phrase "push through it" with people who I am in contact with on a day to day basis.
The mind can make the body do extraordinary things that the body never knew it could do...
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Last edited by EIGHT POINT; 02-06-2020 at 11:51 AM. Reason: spelling
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post #29 of 33 (permalink) Old 02-06-2020, 12:19 PM
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I got a few of those stories.
One thing I have instilled in my kids is that you can still have that kind of fun in today's world. Can't tell you how many times me and/or the boys have struck out with nothing other than a small pack.

We hiked in 1-1/2 miles this year for the last weekend of deer in Bald Eagle. Three day only what we had on our backs.
I walked into the Tionesta area a few times back in the early '80s with nothing but a fishing rod, tin foil, butter and a little camping stuff for a few days eating trout, ramps and a few early season mushrooms.

Slept under a canoe for three nights coming down from East Branch Dam to Hallton. Didn't take a tent, with my newly wedded wife.

My boys have hit deserted Caribbean beaches with just a hammock and fishing rod for the weekend.
I know the good old days are gone, but if you try hard enough you can be happy being wet, cold and hungry right now.
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as waylon would say,
dont go taking me seriously
cause i poked at you in fun

Last edited by Mike Barcaskey; 02-06-2020 at 12:21 PM.
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post #30 of 33 (permalink) Old 02-06-2020, 02:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Mike Barcaskey View Post
I got a few of those stories.
One thing I have instilled in my kids is that you can still have that kind of fun in today's world. Can't tell you how many times me and/or the boys have struck out with nothing other than a small pack.

We hiked in 1-1/2 miles this year for the last weekend of deer in Bald Eagle. Three day only what we had on our backs.
I walked into the Tionesta area a few times back in the early '80s with nothing but a fishing rod, tin foil, butter and a little camping stuff for a few days eating trout, ramps and a few early season mushrooms.

Slept under a canoe for three nights coming down from East Branch Dam to Hallton. Didn't take a tent, with my newly wedded wife.

My boys have hit deserted Caribbean beaches with just a hammock and fishing rod for the weekend.
I know the good old days are gone, but if you try hard enough you can be happy being wet, cold and hungry right now.

My guess... you could probably make me say, "Uncle".

2A-Wash. Co.
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