Evaluation of Hunter Numbers from 1958 to Present - Page 5 - The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community
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post #41 of 60 (permalink) Old 06-06-2018, 01:03 PM
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I have condensed the chart a bit to show only the reported harvest from 1986 to 2017. As you can see there tends to be a correlation between increased doe harvests and a decrease in buck harvest and vice versa. I know from personal experience in our group a few years back a large majority of the antlerless deer killed were Button Bucks. After that season it took several years for us to start seeing more than a handful of legal bucks.
Combine this with AR and it's logical that the number of bucks killed would drop significantly.
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post #42 of 60 (permalink) Old 06-06-2018, 02:39 PM
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Combine this with AR and it's logical that the number of bucks killed would drop significantly.

BINGO!!!


Just like HR was supposed to do.



If AR was not started in 2002, the buck harvest would have been much higher than if the antlerless harvest wasn't increased the previous year. Pan your view out a bit and an increase in antlerless harvest in any year, even if button bucks were protected would also affect the button buck harvest the following year (because less doe make less button bucks) and the 1.5 year old harvest after that and so on.



AR had by far the biggest effect on the buck harvest drop from 2001 to 2002. HR kept it going to where it needed to be until HS. One makes a big effect all at once but the other makes smaller changes over a longer period.



One thing that most folks don't think about is if AR is changed and the ecology of deer doesn't change, then HS will need to turn back into HR and the subsequent buck harvests will again drop but after a 2-3 year lag, assuming the average deer density needs to stay the same.
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post #43 of 60 (permalink) Old 06-06-2018, 05:26 PM
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If not mistaken, the percentage of BBs taken each year, seldom varies much and never has?

I can't make out some of the dates on the charts, but the primary reason for a decline by the latter 1980s, was the gradual loss of hunters in the WWII/Korean War era age group. I think the last year my dad bought a license was around 1989.

He was 69 years old that year, was more interested in heading to FL for six months, than sticking around to hunt. My son started hunting in 1986, so pappy hung around for a few more years to bring the kid to camp for deer, then haul him back home for school.

My dad's generation did a great job of bringing us baby boomers into the hunting fraternity, but many of those in my age group are already in our early 70s and as we age out, the decline is guaranteed to continue.

Because so many of us didn't bring along our kids and grand kids, like our parents did, starting in the late 1950s and for years afterwards. Dozens of reasons why hunter numbers have declined, all of which have been discussed here for years. A supposed lack of deer shouldn't even make the top ten.
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Some folks' learnin' curves just look like circles...3A Camp/also hunt 4B
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post #44 of 60 (permalink) Old 06-06-2018, 06:54 PM
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I have noticed that very few teenagers even bother hunting small game anymore.
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post #45 of 60 (permalink) Old 06-06-2018, 07:27 PM
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Looked at the graphs but fully admit I didn't read through the entire thread.
When I discuss hunting with many folks I find that several topics come up.
-Loss of access
-Loss of opportunity
Many folks have other commitments that consume their time but the biggest things I hear that have lead to a decline is the fact that many have lost access to private land they used to hunt.
I also hear manytell me that they have a hard time keeping their kids interested in general when it comes to hunting.
My biggest fear is this:
Even if a new generation of people do not hunt thats one thing--however when the next generation looses interest in the great outdoors and related activities(not just hunting) this means they also loose interest in preserving our open hunting lands--places in the midwest and other places. When this happens--these same people who are now old enough to determine where money is spent--they no longer see a need to donate money, time and effort to preserve our great public hunting lands.
I am lucky--for now--I own land that hunt on and control it--I feel blessed and very lucky.
In my own personal experience as I said--folks have lost access and opportunity and tell me they see less game so they figure it simply isn't worth tons of effort or money to continue in the sport. They simply have lost the desire to participate.
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post #46 of 60 (permalink) Old 06-07-2018, 08:04 AM
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In my own personal experience as I said--folks have lost access and opportunity and tell me they see less game so they figure it simply isn't worth tons of effort or money to continue in the sport. They simply have lost the desire to participate.
And in today's world, those that lose access do not want to put in the time to get access to different properties. The drive to put in effort to achieve something is declining these days. We are becoming a very passive society.

I support all hunters, regardless of weapon or technique!
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post #47 of 60 (permalink) Old 06-07-2018, 09:01 AM
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And in today's world, those that lose access do not want to put in the time to get access to different properties. The drive to put in effort to achieve something is declining these days. We are becoming a very passive society.



I some what disagree with this due to the following, in this area of south eastern PA a lot of property has changed hands or passed to other family members.


the reception received when asking permission goes from polite, a bit cold, to downright nasty refusals.
after numerous encounters like the last one mentioned, most people stop asking.

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Last edited by bad primer; 06-07-2018 at 09:24 AM.
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post #48 of 60 (permalink) Old 06-07-2018, 09:05 AM
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Taking what your last sentence says, it pretty much supports what was said above. "The drive to put in effort to achieve something is declining these days. We are becoming a very passive society". Effort means you don't quit trying.
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post #49 of 60 (permalink) Old 06-07-2018, 09:13 AM
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WW, splitting hair

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post #50 of 60 (permalink) Old 06-07-2018, 09:20 AM
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I some what disagree with this due to the following, in this area of south eastern PA a lot of property has changed hands or passed to other family

members. the reception received when asking permission goes from polite, a bit cold, to downright nasty refusals.
after numerous encounters like the last one mentioned, most people stop asking.
While this is very true, I can also speak to the other side of the coin.

I am the legal caretaker of a property for an out-of-state owner. I have frequently been approached for permission to hunt the property. Many are nice about it, but some are extremely rude, and some are kind of creepy to be honest.

It doesn't take a lot of doofuses to make a property owner start to get testy when approached. And from what I've seen, the ratio is a majority of decent folks and minority of jackwagons, but...it doesn't take many jackwagons to make some owners just not want to even talk to anyone who mentions hunting.

I am always as polite and courteous as I can be when talking to someone who asks for permission. I appreciate that they asked instead of just going on and hunting (plenty do that ,too). I just don't have room for more hunters.

But...a few won't take no for an answer, or take it very badly, or start off acting very badly. Those are the ones that cause the really negative responses from property owners right out of the gate. They're just tired of the nonsense that some inflict on them.
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