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post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-12-2016, 02:53 PM Thread Starter
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OK mechanics....

So the other day in the rain I ran out to go hunt. Got to the end of the street and the brake peddle goes to the floor. I pump them - seem OK - I pulled into a parking lot hit them a few times everything seems fine. Thought maybe just wet .... well now I got a grinding noise so I'm guessing I need brakes.

Since it's so near to Christmas I was thinking of attempting myself(with help from You-Tube) to save some cash - How big of a job is it(06 F150 4x4) and do I just replace the pads or replace the rotors too - I got no clue... LOL

Thanks for any help.

“Would it save you a lot of time if I just gave up and went mad now?” Douglas Adams
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post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-12-2016, 03:55 PM
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If you are hearing a grinding noise, you are already into the rotors...They will have to be replaced or recut.


Having never changed brakes on a newer ford truck, I cannot say with certainty how hard of a job it is. But generally, Brakes and rotors are not hard to do...Once you jack it up and remove the tire, there is usually 2 bolts(Torx or allen) that hold the caliper to the spindle. Remove them and slide the caliper off the rotor. At this point the rotor is just hanging on the lug nuts....grab it and pull it off. spray the new one down with brake parts cleaner to remove the oil from packaging and slide on the lug nuts.


open the hood and take the cap off your brake fluid reservoir....drape a rag over it to stop any fluid from shooting out. Then remove the outer brake pad from the caliper and use a big C-clamp against the inner pad to compress the caliper piston. Put the new brake pads on the caliper and slide it over the rotor...line up the bolt holes in the spindle and tighten it down. Replace tire and repeat on the other side.


Once you are done, fire it up and step on the brake.....It will go to the floor. It takes a few pumps to push the caliper piston back out to get the pads against the rotor. Once you have a full pedal again, get rid of the rag on top of the fluid reservoir and add a little fluid if necessary....Likely won't need any.


All done. Takes longer to type than it does to do...I've changes a lot of disk brakes....Takes me about 20 minutes per side or so.


Watch a few videos on brake jobs on your particular truck and then have at it...First side will take a bit of time just figuring out how it comes apart and goes back together. The other side will be dead easy.

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post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-12-2016, 04:12 PM
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Take it to a garage, you don't know what you are doing and you must not have anyone to show you how to do it properly.
You will probably mess up more - by doing it yourself, then by paying someone to do it for you.
I can attest that after 40+ years of working on automobiles that even a simple brake job isn't simple anymore with ABS, all the different types of fluid. Different procedures that must be adhered to - to change, add, subtract fluid from the system.
Nothing is as easy as just taking the old stuff off and putting new stuff on anymore.
Even in the GM garage, after a couple of bad installs, they are now required to cut the rotors on the vehicle.. No more brake lathes and generic pads.
Usually if you are asking for help / advice, it tells me that you don't have any experience and you probably don't own the proper tools to do the job.
On a GM vehicle a 2 year old brake rotor on a truck is an old brake rotor and even if you have it cut, it will quickly warp or eat the new brake pad, regardless of how expensive of a pad you buy. The rotors cracks and the cracks opens up when the rotors gets hot and acts like little cutters or a lathe and removes material from the pads each time the brakes are applied.

Most all newer brake pads comes with squealers, a device that makes noise when you apply the brakes. If you ignored the squealers to the point where the pads went down to nothing and now you have metal to metal contact, more than likely the pad fell apart and caused a gap between the rotor and the pad - made the pedal drop and feel spongy.
Pushing the old fluid back into the system can damage the ABS unit and the Master Cylinder.
Don't listen to any dummy that says to open the cap and put a rag over it.
The lint from the rag can get into the fluid and damage the master cylinder and the ABS unit.

That stuff might work on a '78 Ford, but won't fly with a 2000 or newer vehicle.
You got your runnings out of it, now you are going to have to pay - probably extra, to fix what ever damage you caused by driving it past it's limit.

The only plus thing I can say is that the aftermarket equipment available online makes it almost silly to buy from the parts store anymore.
The parts store gets the same parts as you can buy online, marks them up 50 - 150% and gives you some type of cheap warranty.

Maybe there is a Shade Tree Mechanic or a mechanic that works in a garage, and does side jobs at home that can do it for you and save you a couple of bucks.
But any brake job I do includes flushing out the entire brake system.
I would not permit anyone to just change the pads and add fluid to the system..

On GM vehicles, you almost need a TECH II - just to bleed the brakes properly..
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post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-12-2016, 05:05 PM
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Watch the video on youtube.If you get in a bind pm me.Iv't worked on vehicles since 1977.It's easy if you have tools.You won't need to bleed brakes if you follow the instructions.

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post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-12-2016, 05:27 PM Thread Starter
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There was no "chirping" noise before hand. The truck was inspected 1,000 miles ago with no issues except my mechanic broke my E-brake cable. The front brakes were done 9,000 miles ago($70 pads so they weren't bargin brand judging from the prices I looked up today). I am not generally hard on brakes compared to several other drivers I know.

Hiamovi - I may take you up on the PM.... LOL. Not sure when I'll attempt it I don't use the truck much.

“Would it save you a lot of time if I just gave up and went mad now?” Douglas Adams
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post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-12-2016, 07:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerbo View Post
Take it to a garage, you don't know what you are doing and you must not have anyone to show you how to do it properly.
You will probably mess up more - by doing it yourself, then by paying someone to do it for you.
I can attest that after 40+ years of working on automobiles that even a simple brake job isn't simple anymore with ABS, all the different types of fluid. Different procedures that must be adhered to - to change, add, subtract fluid from the system.
Nothing is as easy as just taking the old stuff off and putting new stuff on anymore.
Even in the GM garage, after a couple of bad installs, they are now required to cut the rotors on the vehicle.. No more brake lathes and generic pads.
Usually if you are asking for help / advice, it tells me that you don't have any experience and you probably don't own the proper tools to do the job.
On a GM vehicle a 2 year old brake rotor on a truck is an old brake rotor and even if you have it cut, it will quickly warp or eat the new brake pad, regardless of how expensive of a pad you buy. The rotors cracks and the cracks opens up when the rotors gets hot and acts like little cutters or a lathe and removes material from the pads each time the brakes are applied.

Most all newer brake pads comes with squealers, a device that makes noise when you apply the brakes. If you ignored the squealers to the point where the pads went down to nothing and now you have metal to metal contact, more than likely the pad fell apart and caused a gap between the rotor and the pad - made the pedal drop and feel spongy.
Pushing the old fluid back into the system can damage the ABS unit and the Master Cylinder.
Don't listen to any dummy that says to open the cap and put a rag over it.
The lint from the rag can get into the fluid and damage the master cylinder and the ABS unit.

That stuff might work on a '78 Ford, but won't fly with a 2000 or newer vehicle.
You got your runnings out of it, now you are going to have to pay - probably extra, to fix what ever damage you caused by driving it past it's limit.

The only plus thing I can say is that the aftermarket equipment available online makes it almost silly to buy from the parts store anymore.
The parts store gets the same parts as you can buy online, marks them up 50 - 150% and gives you some type of cheap warranty.

Maybe there is a Shade Tree Mechanic or a mechanic that works in a garage, and does side jobs at home that can do it for you and save you a couple of bucks.
But any brake job I do includes flushing out the entire brake system.
I would not permit anyone to just change the pads and add fluid to the system..

On GM vehicles, you almost need a TECH II - just to bleed the brakes properly..

Classic....I have tears in my eyes.


Obviously you CAN make this stuff up.

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post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-12-2016, 10:46 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by icemole View Post
There was no "chirping" noise before hand. The truck was inspected 1,000 miles ago with no issues except my mechanic broke my E-brake cable. The front brakes were done 9,000 miles ago($70 pads so they weren't bargin brand judging from the prices I looked up today). I am not generally hard on brakes compared to several other drivers I know.

Hiamovi - I may take you up on the PM.... LOL. Not sure when I'll attempt it I don't use the truck much.
The price the garage or parts store charges for brake pads are irrelevant.
I can find $70 brake pads online for as little as $10, the rest is all mark up.
If you have a receipt, take them back, they owe you a new set.

Like I said before, if you replaced the pads and did not replace the rotors, the rotors probably ate the pads.
One of the issues with GM brake rotors is rust migration.
the rust starts on the outer edge of the rotor and migrates towards the center.
Once a rust ridge starts, it eats the outer edge of the pad.
The inside of the rotor rusts and lifts the pad up off of the rotor.
How many times I took rotors off that looked ok on the outside and were pure rust on the inside.
And the key is to always use a torque wrench when you install aluminum wheels.
The other is to remove all rust, dirt, scale off of the back side of the wheels where the surface of the wheel comes in contact with the rotor and hub and to remove the rust ridge from the inside and outside of the brake rotors.
Just installing new pads is not a brake job.
And if you push the old brake fluid back into the caliper, you will probably ruin the caliper or the ABS or the master cylinder.
It's Obvious that Ice mole and some of the other forum members knows nothing about working on brakes. Don't take my advice, it's no skin off my nose..
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post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-13-2016, 06:36 AM
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Jerbo how long did you work as a professional auto technician?Are you ASE certified?

Bob Seger,till it shines.
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post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-13-2016, 08:38 AM
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No offense to any posters here . This is honestly an interesting thread . I've serviced my brakes on all of my vehicles , but I do realize manufacturers have made it increasingly more difficult for us sunday mechanics to service our own vehicles . That being said , I would honestly like to hear if changing brake pads & rotors have become to complicated for the average owner . I personally own a 2011 GMC 1/2 ton pickup .
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post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 12-13-2016, 09:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hiamovi View Post
Jerbo how long did you work as a professional auto technician?Are you ASE certified?
10 years of shop time, worked as a fleet mechanic!
I also owned and operated a successful dirt track race car / team.
Yes I was ASE Certified, ASE is nothing more then passing an exam.

I was on my way to buy a cylinder of air conditioning gas when I was injured in a hit and run automobile accident that ended my working career in 2008.
You can't buy ( Freon) R-22 anymore, and you couldn't ever buy it without a license.
Yes R-22, which is used for home and industrial air conditioning.

I also have a degree in Machining Technologies, 8 yrs machine shop experience,
I was a Carpenter for 8 years, worked as a tire changer in a big tire shop, did warehousing for Walmart - after I helped build the distribution center in Woodland. Also worked several times for Brookville Wood Products - both in the mill and out in the woods as a private contractor - logger. Worked several summers on a dairy farm when I was a kid. I even worked in a couple of grocery stores while I went to college. I wasn't born with a silver spoon in my mouth!

What is your occupation?
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