Federal CWD legislation announced - The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community
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post #1 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-17-2017, 08:44 AM Thread Starter
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Federal CWD legislation announced

Mike Bleech: Federal Chronic Wasting Disease legislation announced - Sports - GoErie.com - Erie, PA

Congressman Ron Kind, WI, and Congressman Jamie Sensenbrenner, WI, introduced on Nov. 21 the Chronic Wasting Disease Management Act (H.R. 4454). This bipartisan legislation would support state and tribal efforts to develop and implement strategies for dealing with CWD. Also it would support research efforts into causes of CWD, and methods for controlling further spread of the disease.
It was referred to the Committee on Agriculture and to the Committee on Natural Resources, which referred it on Nov. 29 to the Subcommittee on Federal Lands.


Diverting funds to deal with CWD is adversely affecting other wildlife programs that were already stretched thin. This bill would direct the Secretary of Agriculture to authorize $35 million to state and tribal wildlife agencies, and agriculture agencies, to implement CWD management strategies. Grants would become available to entities involved in CWD research. Land management agencies in the Department of Agriculture and the Department of the Interior would work collaboratively with state agencies to address the spread of CWD.



CWD has been detected in either wild herds or captive herds in Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Arkansas, Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Virginia, Maryland and New York. In additions, it has been found in Canada Ontario, Manitoba and Saskatchewan. Wild herds are infected in 21 states. This is a growing list.





Between 2004 and 2010, South Korea reported CWD in captive herds. Those animals had been imported from Canada. Also in South Korea, varieties of Sika deer and red deer in a captive facility contracted CWD from elk. Norway reported CWD in 2016.

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post #2 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-17-2017, 01:06 PM
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The dept of Ag shouldn't get a dime, it was deer farming that got this ball rolling to begin with. Money should be taken from the dept of ag 's budget and given to wildlife agencies to look for a solution.
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post #3 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-17-2017, 03:26 PM
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What are the particulars about how deer farming was the start of the CWD problem? I've heard the allegation before but haven't heard exactly how it happened.
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post #4 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-17-2017, 05:01 PM Thread Starter
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the majority of CWD infected deer are found in captive herds. thats how it spread overseas too. i believe the first deer that tested positive in PA were in a captive herd. for some reason the State can not force these breeders to double fence with enough space in between to keep the wild deer away from the captive deer.

if i remember right someone with a captive herd that tested positive let some deer go rather have them killed ? i could be wrong on that one. but captive deer started the ball rolling, not only in PA but other states as well. it get confusing and complicated to follow along. how ever, the CWD prion is now in the soil, gets into plants and can be cross transferred to other animals. its just a metter of time before it mutates and becomes transferable to humans.

maybe not this week, month or year, but its coming.
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post #5 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-17-2017, 05:24 PM
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At one time CWD was confined to west of the Mississippi. The interstate transporting of deer for breeding purposes is responsible for is now having it east of the Mississippi. When the PGC passed regulations to prevent the movement of deer from one propagation plant to another before the herd was declared CWD free, the deer farmers went to the legislature and dept of Ag and got the responsibility of controlling the deer farms taken away and given to ag. That was a stupid and dangerous thing to do because Ag id worthless as an enforcement agency, they will throw in with the deer farmers and try to cover the things they do.. I would like to see every deer farm in the state shut down and all the deer and elk killed and the areas inside the fenced in areas of the deer farmed quarantined for a hundred years, but that will never happen because there is too much money in it and too many people are willing to pay outrageous amounts of money for freak deer. Up until recently, Reindeer did not contract CWD so an exception was made by the PGC to allow them to be transported around the state for Christmas themed programs and shows. I haven't seen anything in the news to say that exception has been rescinded. The ability to jump species barriers is the scary thing about CWD, first Reindeer, then what? Humans? If that happens, deer hunting is pretty much over unless we take to killing them just to eradicate them. Had the PGC had the backing of the hunters and general public perhaps they would still be in charge of the deer and elk farms and we would have more hope than having Ag in charge, they have never really been in charge of anthing!

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post #6 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-17-2017, 11:58 PM Thread Starter
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the legal selling of parts could be another factor too. there are some taxidermist sites that have a for sale section and business looks good.

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post #7 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-18-2017, 09:02 AM
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I wouldn't think the selling of parts would have an impact since it would be hard for live deer to come into contact with the spinal cord or brain or saliva, or feces from parts, however, the sale and use of deer urine should be absolutely outlawed nation wide. They can make synthetic urine now. There is a documented case where a taxidermist had a head and cape thawing out on the floor of his shop and someone snatched a fawn from the wild they thought was abandoned and took it to him. He had it running around in the shop coming in contact with the head on the floor and later that fawn developed CWD and somehow they traced it back to that deer head. I don't remember what state it was in. I will try to net research and see of can find it.

I couldn't find it on the net, it could have been something I read from anther state when I was still working. I did however find this and it is the first time I read about it and cause for concern.

http://www.deeranddeerhunting.com/ar...pass-cwd-fawns - 168k -

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post #8 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-18-2017, 10:15 AM
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I found it! No reference to "Born again

A little different than I remembered.


Details On The NY State
CWD Deer Herds
From Patricia Doyle, PhD
[email protected]
From ProMed Mail
4-29-5

From Gary Nelson
[email protected]

(Gary Nelson is the President and acting director of the NADeFA (North America Deer Farmer's Association) and personally interviewed the owner of the deer that was found to have CWD in NY. - Mod.TG)

As we have all heard, CWD was found in Oneida County, New York. CWD was confirmed on 2 different farms, the 1st farm owned by John Palmer and the 2nd by Martin Proper.

The 1st positive was a 6-year-old doe that was harvested for a fireman's benefit dinner. In talking to John, he said, "I picked out the fattest, healthiest looking doe I had."

Most people have been led to believe that CWD-positive deer exhibit signs of poor health, but the deer farming industry has found this to be untrue. The vast majority of those animals that have tested positive have shown little, if any signs of sickness.

The herd was depopulated only days after the 1st positive was found. On a Tuesday morning, sharpshooters came in and after 6 hours had put down the remaining 18 deer. Samples were collected and sent in for analysis. Friday the results were back; 3 more positives were found for CWD. These 3 deer all came from New York State's Rehabilitation Program. John Palmer acquired these deer from New York's wild population through conservation officers.

John Palmer's herd started when he purchased a few deer from Ohio in 1994. Later, he added other deer from a New York source. 7 years ago John started rehabilitating fawns. John said he took in 1-14 fawns per year from all over New York. John had the responsibility of determining whether the fawn could be released back into the wild or had to stay forever in a pen in his privately owned herd. He also relocated some of these fawns to other producers. This is how Martin Proper came into the picture.

Martin Proper is the owner of the 2nd positive herd. The animal that tested positive for CWD on his farm was a 4- or 5-year-old buck that died from pneumonia, another rehabilitated wild deer from New York. Martin received 2 deer from John Palmer's herd; one doe that was blind and one doe born with only 3 feet. They had bred and had produced some offspring. The aforementioned buck killed one of these does during last year's rut, and was not tested because it happened before their CWD Program was up and running. The rest of Martin's herd was put down and samples analyzed. No other positives were found.

There were 5 positives found in these 2 herds; 4 were deer taken from the wild [as rehabilitated fawns]. It is unclear to John where the very first doe originated, but he felt it could have originated from the wild as well.

Taking deer from the wild is not condoned by the cervid industry and is strongly discouraged; nonetheless, it did happen with the deer in this situation.

A statement released by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) on 5 Apr 2005 announced plans to conduct intensive monitoring of the wild deer population surrounding both farms to determine whether CWD has spread to the wild herds.

The NYS DEC has already directed blame towards the farmed deer industry for bringing CWD into New York, even though there is a clear history of the DEC taking deer out of the wild and placing them into John Palmer's herd for rehabilitation. The question should be, "Where did the wild deer of New York get CWD?"

Adding to the questions, without any answers, John is a taxidermist and has taken work from all over North America. He mentioned receiving work from the following states and Canadian province: Saskatchewan, Montana, Idaho, Illinois, Kansas, Colorado and Wyoming. When looking at where CWD has been found in the wild, many of these locations appear on that list.

In a study released by Beth Williams and Mike Miller, they noted that [a deer] was just as likely to contract CWD from a live infected deer as it was to be housed in a pen with a dead positive carcass.

Did one or more of the many dead animals brought into John's taxidermy studio have CWD? John stated that he kept the rehabilitation fawns in the same garage where he did much of his taxidermy work. It was common practice for John to sweep up his shop and deposit the salt and chemicals along the deer fence as a weed retardant.

The industry has always said that movement of CWD-positive carcasses would move CWD much faster and farther than moving live animals. Is the New York situation just that? Is there a need to regulate movement of CWD-positive carcasses?

There are many points that come to the forefront from the situation in New York:

* The detection of CWD in New York clearly shows that the monitoring system is working. These programs are set up to identify herds at risk.

* This event highlights the need for surveillance. Without the state monitoring/surveillance programs, these positive deer would not be detected. The more herds on these programs, the lower the risk.

* In the face of CWD, the best defense is herd monitoring/surveillance. What better way to get participation than to recognize those who have already participated in these programs and allow for continued movement for their herds that have met the needed criteria? The event in New York has _in no way_ compromised the health status of any herd that has been enrolled in a CWD monitoring/surveillance program.

* CWD conjures up many questions that remain unanswered. There is a continued need for the government agencies involved and the industry to work together to resolve some of those questions.

* As previously seen, in discoveries of CWD, including this New York case, all too often the producer is portrayed as a villain. There is no one who wants this "disease" to be found on their property. When CWD is found, the industry expects the producers to be treated fairly and with respect. The finger-pointing and intimidation tactics are _not_ needed to resolve the issues involved with CWD and private ownership of deer in the United States.

Deer farmers are fathers, mothers, sons, and daughters. They have served this country in the armed forces. Deer farmers come from all walks of life; doctors, lawyers, carpenters, plumbers, and housekeepers. The one thing they all have in common is the passion they have for their deer. Let us work together to resolve the issues that CWD brings to the forefront across this great country of ours.


Gary Nelson, President
NADeFA
[email protected]

[It has been reported in other newspaper sources that the owner of index herd in NY not only put the salt and other products from cleaning up his taxidermy work along his fence lines -- thus exposing his captive herd -- but also that the fawns in the taxidermy garage area may have licked, mouthed, or chewed on entrails from some deer.

It is stated in this NADeFA release that the owner of the index herd was to decide whether the rehabilitated deer could return to the wild or were not capable of survival on their own, presumably because of serious injury, such as 3 legs, or imprinting on people. However, he was instructed to turn some loose in the wild.

If the fawn or fawns in question consumed -- or otherwise contacted -- infected tissues in the taxidermy shop and then were released to the wild, then it could be speculated that NYS DEC would likely find exposed wild animals. If the fawn was originally wild, exposed through taxidermy work on other wild animals, and then released back to the wild, it would be difficult to say that captive animals brought disease to wild animals. It would be more acceptable to say the wild animals have introduced this disease to captive animals. - Mod.TG]


BTW, Gary Nelson is President of the north American deer farmers Assoc. Hence the excuse making.

When you are up to your butt in alligators, it is hard to remember your intent was to drain the swamp. Stay focused!

Last edited by Woods walker; 12-18-2017 at 10:28 AM.
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post #9 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-18-2017, 03:22 PM
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It cannot be definitively said that CWD, east of the Mississippi, originated from a deer farm operator. When one considers how many hundred thousand hunters brought big game animals back from western areas that had the disease compared to the number of deer farm operators that possibly dealt with contaminated animals from the west, statistical probability alone would overwhelmingly indicate otherwise. What is known about CWD is so minute compared to what isn't known that no agency in any state has yet to exhibit any competence in dealing with it or the ability to make any progress toward stopping it.
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post #10 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-18-2017, 04:44 PM Thread Starter
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what do deer processors do with the left overs...bones and scraps ?

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