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post #1 of 5 (permalink) Old 06-30-2014, 11:43 AM Thread Starter
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CWD in WV

Sunday, June 29, 2014

Chronic wasting disease spreads in W.Va.

By John McCoy, Staff writer JOHN McCOY | Sunday Gazette-Mail

Since chronic wasting disease was found in a single Hampshire County deer in 2006,the disease has spread steadily to encompass roughly 108 square miles of Hampshire and Hardy counties.

Sunday Gazette-Mail

Since chronic wasting disease was found in a single Hampshire County deer in 2006, the disease has spread steadily to encompass roughly 108 square miles of Hampshire and Hardy counties.

The numbers are in, and to deer hunters they’re discouraging.

They show that chronic wasting disease is spreading inside West Virginia, and it’s infecting more deer in areas where it occurs. Jim Crum, deer project leader for the state Division of Natural Resources, called statistics from the agency’s latest CWD sampling effort “unsettling.”

“Of the 591 tissue samples we extracted from hunter-killed deer last fall in Hampshire County, 29 were positive for CWD,” Crum said. “That’s the highest number of positives we’ve ever had. The year before, by way of comparison, we took 672 samples and got 16 positives.”

The disease, which kills deer in much the same way mad cow disease kills cattle, was first discovered in the Mountain State near Slanesville, Hampshire County, in 2006. DNR officials immediately set up a “CWD containment zone” in an effort to keep the always-fatal malady from spreading.

They encouraged hunters to kill more deer by setting up a special antlerless-deer hunt within the county. They imposed restrictions on transporting deer carcasses outside the containment zone. They took tissue samples from hunter-killed deer at 11 game-checking stations within Hampshire County. They had agency sharpshooters kill additional deer each spring to help monitor the disease’s prevalence.

Despite their efforts, CWD continued to spread slowly but steadily.

Based on samples taken within a designated 39-square-mile area within the containment zone in central Hampshire County, the prevalence of infected deer has increased from 7 percent to almost 25 percent. Crum said he doesn’t know how high the percentage might eventually go.

“It probably won’t go to 100 percent,” he said. “The highest known prevalence ever reported was about 50 percent, so we’ll probably top out short of that.”

Equally disturbing to DNR officials has been the disease’s geographic spread. In 2006, all the CWD-positive samples were contained within a 15-square-mile area. Since then, the infected area has expanded to 108 square miles and has crossed the line into neighboring Hardy County.

Crum said the expansion has been steady.

“In 2006, the area was 15 square miles; in 2007, it was 25; in 2008, it was 32; in 2009, it was 49; in 2010, it was 61; in 2011, it was 73; in 2012, it was 85; and last year it was 108,” he said. “If you graph that out, it’s a pretty neat line.”

Following that trend, the infected area should increase by approximately 13 square miles a year, a rate that could encompass all of Hampshire County within 40 years.

The worry is that deer from the containment area — especially young, footloose bucks — might wander far enough outside the zone to expand it rapidly. CWD-infected whitetails have been found in parts of Maryland, Virginia and Pennsylvania not far from Hampshire County’s borders.

Crum said the current CWD-positive count for neighboring states’ wild-deer population stands at seven for Virginia, five for Pennsylvania and two for Maryland.

CWD was originally endemic only to states west of the Mississippi River, but leapfrogged its way fairly quickly to Midwestern, Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern states. Because several states’ “first cases” were found near captive deer facilities, wildlife disease experts suspect that deer farmers’ tendency to swap animals across state lines helped spread the disease more rapidly than it otherwise might have.

Crum, himself a Ph.D. in wildlife diseases, said biologists in nearby states are now fully alert to the disease’s potential for spread.

“When we first found CWD here, a few of us biologists from West Virginia, Virginia and Maryland started meeting informally to keep abreast of what was going on,” he said. “At our last meeting, which took place just recently, there were close to 40 people, including folks from Ohio, New York, Delaware and New Jersey.”

Crum said biologists doubt that CWD can be limited to existing areas, mainly because the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s effort to monitor the disease among captive herds “is broke.”

“They have a list, but not all the animals known to be infected are on the list, and [deer farmers and breeders] are transporting animals all over the place,” he said. “Right now, I’m not optimistic we can keep the disease from spreading.”

http://www.wvgazette.com/article/201...140629264/1419

In West Virginia, CWD has been found in 162 white-tailed deer. Testing of road-kill deer in all WV counties has been continuous since 2002. The WVDNR, Wildlife Resources Section, in cooperation with the SE Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study at the University of Georgia and the Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, has tested more than 15,023 deer from West Virginia for CWD and as of June 2014, the 159 Hampshire County deer and three Hardy County deer are the only animals found thus far to have the abnormal prion associated with CWD.

http://www.wvdnr.gov/Regulations/hunting_CWDQA.shtm

Friday, March 07, 2014

37th Annual Southeast Deer Study Group Meeting in Athens, Georgia (CWD TSE Prion abstracts)

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogs...udy-group.html

Friday, February 28, 2014

West Virginia Deer farming bill passes in House unanimously

see case incident of cwd in West Virginia

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogs...ll-passes.html

In West Virginia, CWD has been found in 133 white-tailed deer. Testing of road-kill deer in all WV counties has been continuous since 2002. The WVDNR, Wildlife Resources Section, in cooperation with the SE Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study at the University of Georgia and the Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, has tested over 14,432 deer from West Virginia for CWD and as of June 2013, the 131 Hampshire County deer and two Hardy County deer are the only animals found thus far to have the abnormal prion associated with CWD.

http://www.wvdnr.gov/Regulations/hunting_CWDQA.shtm
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post #2 of 5 (permalink) Old 06-30-2014, 11:44 AM Thread Starter
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Re: CWD in WV

And from Wyoming:

Chronic Wasting Disease Ecology and Epidemiology of Mule Deer and White-tailed Deer in Wyoming

Dr. Brant Schumaker of the University of Wyoming reported that the effects of high chronic wasting disease (CWD) prevalence in free-ranging deer populations are unknown. In south-central Wyoming, CWD prevalence exceeds 50% in hunter harvested deer. We hypothesized that 1) vital rates are depressed by CWD and the finite rate of population growth (λ) is subsequently lowered, 2) CWD alters normal deer behavior during preclinical and clinical disease, and 3) genetic differences associated with CWD incubation periods drives natural selection to favor less susceptible deer. To test these hypotheses, we radio-collared white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and monitored them to determine a) survival probability, pregnancy rates, and annual recruitment, b) cause of death, c) home range area and habitat use, d) migration patterns, e) dispersal behavior, and f) genetic variation in incubation period based on CWD-status. Deer were tested for CWD using tonsil tissue collected by biopsy at capture and immunohistochemistry. White-tailed deer positive for CWD were 4.5 times more likely to die annually compared to CWD-negative deer. High CWD prevalence depressed survival of young females and resulted in an unsustainable white-tailed deer population (λ < 1.0); however, when female harvest was eliminated, the population became stable (λ =1.0). Female CWD-positive white-tailed deer maintain locally high CWD incidence as they migrated less and occupied smaller home ranges compared to other deer. Male CWD-positive white-tailed deer migrated at the highest proportion and likely contributed to spread of CWD to disparate populations. In the last nine years, mule deer genetically associated with prolonged incubation periods to CWD have increased in frequency in the population. However, it is still unknown whether or not this change will counteract the negative impacts of CWD on the population. The white-tailed deer population is adversely affected by high CWD prevalence; however, implementing management techniques to increase annual survival of females may maintain deer populations. The impact of CWD on mule deer populations is currently unknown; however, the present study is in its final stages with results to be completed in the near future. ...



Sunday, June 29, 2014

Chronic Wasting Disease Ecology and Epidemiology of Mule Deer and White-tailed Deer in Wyoming

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogs...ology-and.html
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post #3 of 5 (permalink) Old 06-30-2014, 11:46 AM Thread Starter
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Re: CWD in WV

"They encouraged hunters to kill more deer by setting up a special antlerless-deer hunt within the county. They imposed restrictions on transporting deer carcasses outside the containment zone. They took tissue samples from hunter-killed deer at 11 game-checking stations within Hampshire County. They had agency sharpshooters kill additional deer each spring to help monitor the disease’s prevalence.

Despite their efforts, CWD continued to spread slowly but steadily."

Sounds like the same thing PA is doing. Can't we look at other states and learn instead of following the same incorrect path?


And what I think we should be doing:

The white-tailed deer population is adversely affected by high CWD prevalence; however, implementing management techniques to increase annual survival of females may maintain deer populations. The impact of CWD on mule deer populations is currently unknown; however, the present study is in its final stages with results to be completed in the near future. ...
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post #4 of 5 (permalink) Old 06-30-2014, 12:10 PM
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Re: CWD in WV

During the May 2014 BOC Working Group meeting, they had a power point on the history of CWD in PA.

One frame featured a map of the locations of WV, MD, and PA CWD positive deer.

The most obvious and glaring thing about that map was every CWD positive deer aligned basically along one ridge line extending from WV into PA. A wildlife super highway as it were.

Then, when the bear biologist presented his report on the Urban Bear Study - the one with the GPS reporting collars - several of the bears used the same ridge line several times over numerous counties including Bedford where the PA CWD outbreaks occurred.

Dispersal of yearling bucks is being looked at as a prime reason for the disease spread.

The GC Yearling dispersal study results are on the deer page on the GC site. Extensive information on the distances and manner yearling bucks move when Ma kick's them out.


The video of the CWD Report with time stamp and link to the video is in Outdoor Issues for the April 2014 Working Group Meeting. Might be on page two by know. I will find it and bring it to page one so it is easier to find.


for those interested in this, or for anyone affected by the DMA 2 - this should be a priority to watch or listen to. Lots of very good information it as to when, why, how, and future actions.


Is your position a short term gain - or a long term loss? Separate the issues.
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post #5 of 5 (permalink) Old 06-30-2014, 12:18 PM
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Re: CWD in WV

CWD In PA - Now and Beyond. BOC / GC Video


This is the discussion on CWD in the state of Pennsylvania now, and into the future. No decisions are made, but the in's and out's and what the future may or may not hold are discussed in great detail.


Video starts at 54:30 use slide bar to find the start.


http://www.livestream.com/pagamecommissi...medium=ui-thumb


Working group - other video all links and time stamps for video:

https://www.huntingpa.com/forums/ubbt...54#Post3339554

Is your position a short term gain - or a long term loss? Separate the issues.
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